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Full text of "TRS-80 Manual: Zorlof Word Processing (1982)(Anitek)"

n The Magnificent 

WORD PROCESSING SYSTEM 



Model I 

Version 2.1 

Serial # AA1210113 

Manual D 



Software Products 
P.O. Box 1136 
Melbourne, FL 32935 
Phone: 305-259-9397 



Copyright © 1982. All rights reserved. 



LIMITED GUARANTEE 



This product is sold on an "AS IS" basis and is without 
warranty. The advertisements used to promote this product and 
the manual provided with this product are believed to be fair 
descriptions of this product's capabilities! but are in no way 
guarantees of actual performance. If the purchaser discovers 
that this product will not meet his word processing needs or is 
in any other way dissatisfied with its performance* he may 
return it to place of purchase within thirty days from the date 
of purchase and receive a full refund. Returns must include the 
original sales slip, must be post-marked no later than thirty 
days after date of sale, and must contain the original manual 
and diskette in like-new condition with serial numbers on each 
intact. 



"WAIVER OF LIABILITY 



ANITEK shall have no liability or responsibility to 
purchaser or any other person or entity regarding liability! 
loss, or damage caused, or alleged to be caused, directly or 
indirectly, by use of programs, program manuals, or segments of 
either which are part of this or any other product provided by 
ANITEK. This includes, but is not limited to, any loss of 
business or anticipated profits resulting from such loss of 
business, or any interruption of service or consequential 
damages, whether physical, monetary, material, or of any other 
kind! resulting from any use of such programs or- program 
manuals! or segments of either. 



DECLARATION OF COPYRIGHT 



This product, both manual and operating program, is 
copyrighted. ANITEK authoriies each ZDRLDF purchaser the right 
to make back-up copies for the sole personal use of said 
purchaser. Any other duplication of the ZORLOF manual and/or 
operating program, in whole or in part, is unlawful and strictly 
prohibited. 



Welcome to the Magic of 




V 



The Magnificent 



REQUIRED HARDWARE 

i. TRS-89 model I or III. 

2. 32K or more memory, 

3. 1 or more disk, drives 

4. One of the following DQS's: TRSDOS, LODS, DOSPLUS, 
NEWDOS, NEWDOS/88, or MULTIDOS (single or double density). 

5. Lower case modification (Model i only). 

6. Line printer (can be either parallel or serial). 

Note: Any standard line printer will work. However f using one 
which ZORLOF specially supports (see section 5.1) will give you 
more word processing power than using another brand. 

RECOGNITION OF TRADEMARKS 

1. TRS-88, TRSDOS. Line Printer IV, Line Printer VI, Daisy 
Wheel II, and Radio Shack are trademarks of Tandy 
Corporation. 

2. Microline is a trademark of OKI Electric Industry Company, 
LTD. 

3. Starwriter F-18, Starwriter FP-1500, and Prowriter 8518 
are trademarks of C. Itoh Electronics, Inc. 

4. Epson, MX-&e, MX-188, Graftrax,and Gr-aftrax Plus are 

trademarks of Epson America, Inc. 

5. Centronics 73? and Centronics 739 are trademarks of 
Centronics Data Corporation. 

6. Qume is a trademark of Qume Corporation. 

7. Diablo 638 is a trademark of Diablo Systems, Inc. 

8. Spinwriter 5518, 5515, 5520, 5525, and FC-8823A-C are 

trademarks of NEC America, Inc. 

9. TEC 8508R is a trademark of Tec Corporation. 

19. Brother HR-i is a trade mark of Brother Industries, LTD. 

11. ComRiter CR-i is a trademark of Comrex International, Inc. 

12. Smith-Corona TP-i is a trademark of Smith-Corona. 

13. LDOS is a trademark of Logical Systems, Inc. 

14. NEWDOS and NEWDOS/88 are trademarks of Apparat, Inc. 
i5. DOSPLUS is a trademark of Micro Systems Software, Inc. 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



1. GETTING STARTED 

2. WORD-WRAP AND LINE JUSTIFICATION 

2.1. WORD-WRAP 

2.2. LINE JUSTIFICATION 



Page 
1 

3 

4 
5 



• 



STATUS 


LINES 


3.1. 


NAME FIELD 


3.2. 


WIDTH FIELD 


3.3. 


WORD COUNT FIELD 


3.4. 


LINE COUNT FIELD 


3.5. 


FREE MEMORY COUNT FIELD 


3.6. 


SEARCH FIELD 


3.7. 


REPLACE FIELD 


3.8. 


ERROR MESSAGE FIELD 


EDITING 


COMMANDS 


4.1. 


CURSOR RIGHT 


4.2. 


CURSOR LEFT 


4.3. 


CURSOR UP 


4.4. 


CURSOR DOWN 


4.5. 


CURSOR FAR RIGHT 


4.6. 


CURSOR FAR LEFT 


4.7. 


SCROLL UP 


4.8. 


SCROLL DOWN 


4.9. 


PAGE UP 


4.ie. 


PAGE DOWN 


4.11. 


DELETE CHARACTER 


4.12. 


DELETE CHARACTER BACKWARDS 


4.13. 


LOWER CASE 


4.14. 


UPPER CASE 


4.15. 


CAPITAL LOCK 


4.16. 


PRINTER COMMAND CHARACTER 


4.17. 


SPECIAL FUNCTION CHARACTER 


4.18. 


PRINT SCREEN 


4.19. 


AUTOMATIC SEARCH AND REPLACE 


4.2e. 


BLOCK MARKER INSERT 


4.21. 


COPY BLOCK 


4.22. 


DIRECTORY 


4.23. 


END OF TEXT 


4.24. 


FILE TEXT TO DISK 


4.25. 


GET TEXT FROM DISK 


4.26. 


HOME CURSOR 



9 

11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

17 

18 
18 
18 
18 
18 
19 
19 
19 
19 
19 
2» 
26 
29 
20 
21 
21 
22 
22 
22 
23 
23 
23 
24 
24 
24 
25 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

4.27. INSERT 25 

4.28. REJUST1FY 25 

4.29. KILL FILE ON DISK 26 

4.30. TAB 27 
4.3 i. DELETE LIKE 28 

4.32. MOVE BLOCK 28 

4.33. STORE BLOCK TO DISK 28 

4.34. OPEN LINE 28 

4.35. PRINT TEXT 29 

4.36. QUEUE FILES FOR PRINTING 29 

4.37. SEARCH 30 

4. 38. REPLACE 30 

4.39. TOP OF TEXT 31 

4.40. UNDERLINE 31 

4.41. VIEW TEXT 32 

4.42. DELETE WORD 32 

4.43. EXPANDED CHARACTERS 33 

4.44. SPLIT TEXT 34 

4.45. TERMINATE FUNCTION 34 

4.46. DELETE BLOCK 34 

4.47. RETURN CHARACTER 35 

4.48. BLANK CHARACTER 35 

4.49. END-OF-SENTENCE CHARACTER 36 

4.50. STATUS LINE HOME 36 

4.51. LEFT BRACKET CHARACTER 36 

4.52. RIGHT BRACKET CHARACTER 36 

4.53. RESET 36 

4.54. SUPERSCRIPT CHARACTER 37 

4.55. SUBSCRIPT CHARACTER 37 

4.56. RENUMBER 3? 

4.57. UNDERLINED SPACE CHARACTER 38 

4.58. ZAP-PROCESSING 38 

4.59. reserved for future release 40 

4.60. reserved -for future release 40 

4.61. CANCEL KEYBOARD CLICK 41 

5. PRINTER COMMANDS 43 

5.1. PRINTER TYPE 44 

5.2. AUTOMATIC LINE-FEED INSERTION 46 

5.3. BAUD RATE FOR SERIAL PRINTERS 47 

5.4. SETTING OF TABS 48 

5.5. INDIVIDUAL SHEET PAUSING 49 

5.6. SHEET SIZE SET 50 

5.7. TOP TEXT LINE SET 51 

5.8. END TEXT LINE SET 52 

5.9. TEXT LEFT MARGIN 53 

5.10. LINE SPACING 54 

5.1 1. JUSTIFY MODE SET 55 

5.12. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDE TEXT INDENTING 56 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 

5.13. EXPANDED WIDTH CHARACTERS 57 

5.14. CONDENSED WIDTH CHARACTERS 53 

5.15. NORMAL WIDTH CHARACTERS 59 

5.16. CHARACTER DENSITY 60 

5.17. BOLDING TEXT 61 

5.18. UNDERLINING TEXT 62 

5.19. ITALIC TEXT 63 

5.20. SUPER/SUBSCRIPTING TEXT 64 

5.21. SUPRESS LINE-FEED 65 

5.22. SUPRESS CARRIAGE- RETURN 66 

5.23. TURN PRINTING OFF AND ON 67 

5.24. GO TD LINE NUMBER 68 

5.25. GO RELATIVE 69 

5.26. PRINTER CONTROL CODES 70 

5.27. SPECIAL FUNCTION CHARACTER 71 

5.28. HEADER LINE SET 73 

5.29. FOOTER LINE SET 74 

5.30. PAGE NUMBER LINE SET 75 

5.31. HEADER LINE FORMAT 76 

5.32. FOOTER LINE FORMAT 77 

5.33. PAGE NUMBER LINE FORMAT 78 

5.34. HEADER LINE LEFT MARGIN 79 

5.35. FOOTER LINE LEFT MARGIN 79 

5.36. PAGE NUMBER LINE LEFT MARGIN 79 

5.37. PAGE NUMBER SET 80 

5.38. FORM LETTER DATA FILE SPECIFICATION 81 

5.39. FORM LETTER DATA ID QUALIFIER 32 

6. EDITING BASIC AND EDTASM FILES 83 

6.1. WIDTH FIELD 34 

6.2. OPEN LINE 84 

6.3. RENUMBERING 35 

6.4. TABBING 85 

6.5. LINE LENGTH 86 

6.6. PRINTER COMMANDS 86 

7. PROCESSING FORM LETTERS 87 



APPENDIX 

A. EXPLANATION OF FILE TYPES 93 

B. CUSTOMIZING ZORLOF - 95 



• 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



CHARACTER SYMBOLS 



NOTE: The characters within parentheses throughout this manual 
are those character representations that are displayed on the 
Model I computer. These differ- from those displayed on the 
Model III as follows: 



CHARACTER 


MODEL I 


MODEL III 


RETURN 


*- 


] 


SUPERSCRIPT 


t 


C 


SUBSCRIPT 


I 


\ 


BLOCK MARKER 


¥ 


rfV 


BLANK 


m 


± 


SPECIAL FUNCTION 


£ 


\ 


TAB 


-+ 


/\ 


END-OF-SENTENCE 


m 


m 



1. GETTING STARTED 



1.1. Fill out and send in the enclosed registration card. This 
is our only way of knowing who has bought ZORLOF and how 
you can be reached. If a card was not provided with your 
system, please write your name, address, phone number, 
serial number of the disk., date of purchase, and a brief 
description of your hardware, and how you expect to be 
using ZORLOF on a piece of paper and mail '■'■. to ANITEK, 
P. 0. Box 1136, Melbourne, Florida, 32935. 



1.2. Read the manual cover to cover. A thorough understanding 
of its contents is important. Then remove the the summary 
card from the back, of this manual and refer to it as you 
use ZORLOF to help you remember what you read in the 

manual. 



1.3. Copy ZORLOF and the example text files from the master 
disk to a TRSDOS compatible operating system disk.. The 
file names are ZORLQF/CMB, SAMPLE/TXT, FORM/TXT, 
FORM/DAT. Once the original is copied, store it away in a 
safe place and don't ever use it for anything except 
making more copies. 



1.4. Boot up your system with a DOS disk that contains 
ZORLQF/CMD. Type "ZORLOF", then hit the ENTER key. After 
a few seconds the screen will blank except for two status 
lines at the top of the screen (explained in Section 3) 
and a blinking rectangle at the start of the next line 
down (this is the cursor, the point at which your typing 
takes place). ZORLOF is now running. 



1.5. Now you are ready to type. Be sure you have a pretty good 
understanding of the rest of the manual so you will know 
how everything works. The system was made very 
"user-friendly" so we're sure you will be taking command 
of ZORLOF's infinite powers in no time at all. 



• 



GETTING STARTED Page 



1.6. At this point you may wish to familiarize yourself with 
the sample text files supplied on the ZORLOF master disk. 
SAMPLE/TXT will demonstrate many of the PRINT FORMAT 
commands and how they work (explained in section 5). 
FORM/TXT and FORM/DAT together give an example of how a 
form letter text file and form letter data file might be 
set up Explained in section 7). Both of these examples 
can be run on your system if you first change the PRINTER 
SPECIFICATION commands (see 5.1) to that which matches 
your- own printer. 



1.7. Once you understand the manual and have tried some of the 
examples, we don't expect you to have any difficulties 
using ZORLOF. However, should you need any assistance or 
have a question concerning this product, just give us a 
call or drop us a note. We'd be more than happy to help 
you in any way we can. 



Page 2 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



2. TXTORD-TXTRAF AND JUSTIFICATION 



The operator- of ZORLOF is free to type continuously* never 
worrying about where to break the lines, or how the spacing 
between the words should be to achieve proper line 
justification. ZORLOF does this all for you automatically! 
using its advanced WORD-WRAP and LINE JUSTIFICATION capabilities 
which match and even surpass those found on many of the higher 
priced word processing systems. Both of these features will 
become very powerful text editing tools for you once they are 
understood. 



# 



WORD-WRAP AND JUSTIFICATION Page 



2.1. WORD-WRAP 



If a word that you are typing will not fit on the line 
without spilling over the end of the line (see 3.2 for line 
length specifications)) then ZDRLDF will automatically take that 
word off that line and put it on the next line. At the same 
timei the line you were typing on automatically justifies on the 
screen. 

Another part of the WORD-WRAP capabilities of ZORLOF is 
REVERSE WORD-WRAP. Any time you type a space on a line, ZORLOF 
will check to see if the wordls) from the beginning of the line 
to that space can fit on the previous line. If it can then it 
is "wrapped backwards", so to speak, and put at the end of the 
previous line. The previous line is then re-justified and the 
cursor is moved back to the second column of the current line 
(second, because the space is in the first). ZORLOF will 
continue to move words up to the end of the previous line with 
each space you type until the previous line is full. 

While scrolling up, the WORD-WRAP function in ZORLOF will 
always put as many words on a line as will fit. Lines 
containing a RETURN character «-M4,47)» however, are the 

exception. No text will ever be put on a line following a 
RETURN character while scrolling. At the same time, any text 
that you may have typed on a line following a RETURN character 
will be lost when that line is scrolled off the screen. 



Page 4 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



2.2. LINE JUSTIFICATION 



ZORLOF has very advanced LINE JUSTIFICATION routines which 
automatically justify the lines of your text, not only as they 
are printed, giving you a very professional-looking copy, but 
also right on the screen as you type, giving you the opportunity 
to see how the text is going to look before you ever print it. 
You can format your text using one (or a combination) of four 
different LINE JUSTIFICATION modes. They are: 



JUSTIFY LEFT 



JUSTIFY RIGHT 



JUSTIFY BOTH 



JUSTIFY CENTER 



All text lines start in the first 
character- column to form a smooth 
margin on the left side of the 
screen and paper. 

All text lines end in the last 

character column to form a smooth 

margin on the right side of the 

screen and paper-. 

All text lines start and end in the 
first and last character columns, 
respectively, to form smooth margins 
on both sides of the screen and 
paper. The spacing between words is 
done automatically. 

All text lines are centered on 
screen and on paper. 



If desired, you can change the LINE JUSTIFICATION mode at 
any place in your text -- having one paragraph set to JUSTIFY 
LEFT, the next to JUSTIFY CENTER, etc. The default 
justification mode is JUSTIFY LEFT. Refer to section 5.11 for- 
instructions on how to set the LINE JUSTIFICATION mode within 
your text. 

If you happen to own a printer- type K3» K7, K8, K?, Kli, 
Ki3» K14, Ki6, K29 (5.1), you will be pleased to know that 
ZORLOF can take advantage of the full power of the 
proportional-space text-printing feature that these printers 
have. Each line will be justified, as with any printer, but all 
the between-ward spacings will be made exactly equal and the 
spaces between characters will be uniformly increased to avoid 
excessive between-word spacing, whenever necessary. The result 
is a printed page that looks almost like it was run off on an 
expensive typesetter. 



WORD-WRAP AND JUSTIFICATION 



Page 



Using ZORLOF with any one of these types of printers» you 
can also specify any character- print density from 6.8 to 28.9 
characters per line inch. The maximum print density you will 
actually be able to achieve and still have lines correctly 
justify will depend on the average character width for your 
printer. About 14 characters per inch is as tight as you will 
normally be able to print on a dot matrix printer t and about li 
characters per inch on a daisy wheel. This manual was printed 
in proportional-space mode at a character density of 11.6 
characters per inch using NEC PC-8C23A-C printer. Refer to 
section 5.16 for instructions on how to specify CHARACTER 
DENSITY within your test. 



Page 6 ZORLOF 'OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



3. STATUS LINES 



The top two display lines on your screen are reserved for 
status information. These lines can never be scrolled off, or 
removed from the screen. 

When ZORLOF first comes up* the cursor will be positioned 
over to the left just under the second STATUS LIME. The only 
way to get the cursor into the STATUS LINES from this point (or 
from any point in the text portion of the display) is to hold 
down the CLEAR key and strike the "»" key. This is denoted 
CLEAR-« (see 4.56). 

You will notice that ZORLOF will only allow the cursor to 
go into certain areas of the STATUS LIMES and not others. This 
is a protective measure to keep you from typing over any part of 
the STATUS LINES that should not be changed. Also, some 
functions are not operable while the cursor is in the STATUS 
LINE (see begining of section 4 for list). This* too, is 
precautionary to protect the STATUS LINES. 

There are 5 fields in the first STATUS LINE. Two of them, 
the NAME FIELD and the WIDTH FIELD, are for you to type 
information in to tell ZORLOF certain things about the text you 
are working on. The other three, the WORD COUNT FIELD, the LINE 
COUNT FIELD, and the FREE MEMORY FIELD are for ZORLOF to write 
information in to tell you certain things about the text. The 
second STATUS LINE contains the SEARCH FIELD and the REPLACE 
FIELD, which you use to type the SEARCH and REPLACE strings in 
while using those respective functions (4.37, 4.38). When 
needed, ZORLOF will use the second STATUS LINE for displaying 
the ERROR MESSAGES. Each of these fields is discussed in detail 
on the following pages. 



STATUS LINES Page 



3.1. NAME FIELD 



This is the Held where you type the name of the text 
file. This is the name that ZORLOF will use when you go to file 
your text onto the disk. The name must ■follow the file 
specification format as dictated by your disk, operating system 
(consult your- DOS operator's manual) i and must be no longer than 
14 characters) including the extension and drive specification 
<if used). Passwords are not allowed as part of the file name. 

Also, anytime you get a text file from the disk» unless 
there is already text in the computer's memory at the time* 
ZORLOF will take the name that you have used in specifying that 
file and write it into the NAME FIELD for you. This saves you 
some trouble and it also helps to prevent you from writing the 
file back out to disk under the wrong name. 



Page 8 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



• 



3.2. WIDTH FIELD 



This is the -field where you type the maximum width (in 
characters) of your copy. This is also referred to as maximum 
line length in other parts of this manual. Any width -from 5 to 
128 may be entered in this field. Portions of text can be made 
narrower than this maximum specification by implementing the 
LEFT AND RIGHT SIDE TEXT INDENTING printer commands as described 
in section 5.12. 

Since your display screen is limited to only 64 character 
lines, ZORLOF will automatically assign two display lines for 
each text line any time you specify text lines to be greater 
than 64 characters. In this case, the WORD-WRAP and 
JUSTIFICATION routines will treat each second line as an 
extension of the line before it and not as a separate line. You 
will get a better- feel for- how this is done when you begin to 
use ZORLOF. 

It is possible to type your- text in one width and then 
change it later to a different width if you so desire. Just 
type the new width in the WIDTH FIELD and hit CLEAR-T (4.3?). 
Voila, the text is automatically reformatted, word-wrapped, and 
line justified to the new line length. 

You may also be happy to know that the information in the 
WIDTH FIELD is saved as part of the file data every time you 
file the text (or even a portion of the text — see 4.22) onto 
disk. Then, the next time you call that text file back to the 
screen to work, on it, ZORLOF will automatically extract that 
information from the file and write it into the WIDTH FIELD for 
you, saving you a lot of time and trouble. If, however, you are 
getting a text file from disk to insert it into text that is 
already on the display screen, the width information of that 
second file is just stripped from the text data of the file and 
ignored, maintaining the width of the first file. 

The WIDTH FIELD is used in a slightly different way when 
editing files other than ZORLQF-type text files. During these 
times, the width field will contain a three character- 
abreviation for the type of file being edited. If you are using 
ZORLOF to create one of these non-ZORLOF-standard files you will 
need to type the appropriate 3 characters in the WIDTH FIELD 
before you start. If you are using ZOROF to edit a pre-existing 
file, then the correct three character abreviation will appear 
in the WIDTH FIELD automatically as the file is being loaded in 
from the disk. The various types of non-standard files that 
ZORLOF can create and/or edit, along with their three character 
abreviations, and explanations of the unique characteristics of 
each type of file are given in Appendix A, in the back of this 
manual. I you have any desire to use ZORLOF for editing BASIC 



STATUS LINES Page 



programsi Assembly language source files* other word processing 
systems' text files* or- patching machine code programs* it is 
recomended that you review Appendix A. 



Page i» ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



3.3. WORD COUNT FIELD 



This -field contains a dynamic count of the total number of 
words in your text -filet both on the screen and in memory, and 
is updated each time you strike a key. A word is de-fined by a 
character or a string o-f characters separated from other 
characters by one or- more SPACE characters ( )» BLANK characters 
(SO, END-OF-SENTENCE characters (m), TAB characters (->)» 
UNDERLINED SPACE characters (_), the start of a line, or the end 
of a line. Characters in printer command lines (lines starting 
with PRINTER COMMAND characters; see 4.16) are not counted. The 
in-formation contained in this field is maintained by ZQRLQF and 
cannot be changed manually by the user. 

Note: During ZAP-PROCESSING (4.58) the data contained in this 
field will be irrelevant and will not correspond to the number 
of words in the file. 



STATUS LINES P*ge 11 



3.4. LINE COUNT FIELD 



This Held contains a dynamic count of the total number of 
lines in your text file* both on the screen and in memory, this 
is updated each time you strike a key. A text line is equal to 
one display line if your text width is 64 characters or smaller, 
or equal to two display lines if your text width is 65 
characters or larger. Printer command lines (lines starting 
with PRINTER COMMAND characters, see 4.16) are not counted. The 
information contained in this field is maintained by ZORLOF and 
cannot be changed manually by the user. 

Note: During ZAP-PROCESSING (4.58) the data contained in this 
field will be irrelevant and will not correspond to the number 
of lines in the file. 



Page 12 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



3.5. FREE MEMORY COUNT FIELD 



This -field contains a dynamic count of the unused memory 
space still available for character entry» and is updated each 
time you strike a key. The information contained in this field 
is maintained by ZORLOF and cannot be changed manually by the 
user. 

Note: During ZAP-PROCESSING (4.58) the data contained in this 
field will be irrelevant and will not correspond to the actual 
free memory. 



STATUS LINES Page 13 



3.6. SEARCH FIELD 



If there is some string of characters that you want to 
SEARCH through your text fort you can have ZQRLQF do it for you 
automatically. Type the string of characters in the SEARCH 
FIELD (maximum 28 characters) and hit CLEAR-S (4.37). ZQRLOF 
will automatically scan the entire text, from the cursor down, 
looking for that string of characters. If found, the cursor 
will stop on the first character of the string. If not -found, 
the cursor will stop on the next empty line after the end of the 
text. 

When entering the character string in the SEARCH FIELD you 

can use upper case or lower; it really doesn't matter. ZQRLOF 

will look for that string in any combination of upper case or 
lower case. 

The BLANK character (*) in the SEARCH string is used as a 
wild card. Use it when you wish to SEARCH for a string in which 
some of the characters in the string have to be certain things* 
but other characters can be anything. 

Use the RETURN character (« in the SEARCH FIELD to define 
the end of a SEARCH string, otherwise it is assumed to be the 
right-most non-space character in the field. This is necessary 
if you want to search for the word "at", but you don't want the 
cursor to stop on the word "attack". In this case the SEARCH 
string should be entered: space, "a", "t", space, RETURN 
character. The space after the "at" is now taken to be the last 
character- of the string, and ZORLQF will know just to stop on 
the word "at", and not "atom" or "cat". 



Page 14 ZORLQF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



3.5. FREE MEMORY COUNT FIELD 



This -field contains a dynamic count of the unused memory 
space still available for character entry* and is updated each 
time you strike a key. The information contained in this field 
is maintained by ZORLOF and cannot be changed manually by the 
user. 

Note: During ZAP-PROCESSING (4.58) the data contained in this 
field will be irrelevant and will not correspond to the actual 
free memory. 



STATUS LINES Page 13 



3.6. SEARCH FIELD 



If there is some string of characters that you want to 
SEARCH through your text fort you can have ZORLOF do it for you 
automatically. Type the string of characters in the SEARCH 
FIELD (maximum 28 characters) and hit CLEAR-S (4.37). ZDRLQF 
will automatically scan the entire text, from the cursor down» 
looking for that string of characters. If found, the cursor 
will stop on the first character of the string. If not found, 
the cursor will stop on the next empty line after the end of the 
text. 

When entering the character string in the SEARCH FIELD you 

can use upper case or lower; it really doesn't matter. ZORLOF 

will look for that string in any combination of upper case or 

lower case. 

The BLANK character (*) in the SEARCH string is used as a 

wild card. Use it when you wish to SEARCH for a string in which 
some of the characters in the string have to be certain things, 
but other characters can be anything. 

Use the RETURN character «-> in the SEARCH FIELD to define 
the end of a SEARCH string, otherwise it is assumed to be the 
right-most non-space character in the field. This is necessary 
if you want to search for the word "at", but you don't want the 
cursor to stop on the word "attack". In this case the SEARCH 
string should be entered: space, "a", "t", space, RETURN 
character. The space after the "at" is now taken to be the last 
character of the string, and ZORLOF will know just to stop on 
the word "at", and not "atom" or "cat". 



Page 14 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



3.7. REPLACE FIELD 



Sometimes when you SEARCH for- a string of characters you 
will want to REPLACE it with another string of characters. You 
can do so using this field and the REPLACE function (4.38). 

Type the replacement string of characters in the REPLACE 
FIELD just as you would want it to appear in your text. BLANK 
characters (1) count as actual BLANK characters. The case of 
each character- (upper or lower) does matter* so type each 
character in the case that you want it. The RETURN character 
«-> can be used in the REPLACE FIELD the same way it is used in 
the SEARCH FIELD if you want the REPLACE string to end with a 
space instead of a character. 

Once you have typed the replacement string in the REPLACE 
FIELD, hit CLEAR-S to SEARCH for the text string that you are 
going to REPLACE* then hit CLEAR-R. The string of characters 
that you have SEARCHED for will be removed at the cursor, and a 
copy of the string of characters in the REPLACE FIELD will be 
automatically written in its place. 

The REPLACE string, by definition, is a replacement for 
the SEARCH string. Thus, hitting CLEAR-R at any time that the 
cursor is not positioned at the start of a portion of text that 
matches the SEARCH string, nothing will happen. 

While we are on the subject, you might as well be 
introduced to one more capability of ZORLOF which relates to the 
SEARCH and REFLACE functions — the AUTOMATIC SEARCH AND REPLACE 
function. This function will automatically SEARCH through your 
entire text, from the cursor down, and change every occurrence 
of the SEARCH string with a copy of the REPLACE string. See 
section 4.1? for more information on the AUTOMATIC SEARCH AND 
REPLACE function. 

Note: AUTOMATIC SEARCH AND DELETE is done the same way as the 
AUTOMATC SEARCH AND REPLACE except that the REPLACE FIELD is 
left blank. 



STATUS LINES Page 15 



3.8. ERROR MESSAGE FIELD 



You cannot see this ■field when ZORLOF first comes up* but 
it really is there. Actually) under certain error conditions* 
the SEARCH FIELD and the REPLACE FIELD are temporarily removed 
and stored in the computer's memory. This leaves the entire 
second line available for the ERROR MESSAGE. The appropriate 
ERROR MESSAGE flashes on the screen a few times, letting you 
know what has happened. Then the SEARCH FIELD and REPLACE FIELD 
return to the screen with the same information they had before 
the error- condition occurred* and you are free to take whatever 
measures are necessary to correct the error condition* such as 
delete an obsolete file if your disk is full* etc. 

The error conditions that ZORLOF checks for and the ERROR 
MESSAGES that result are as follows: 



"DISK ERROR, TRY AGAIN" 

"DISK FULL" 

"WRITE PROTECTED DISKETTE" 

"DISK NOT READY" 

"FILE PROTECTED" 

"NO SUCH FILE" 

"DIRECTORY FULL" 

"MEMORY FULL" 

"BAD BLOCK" 

"QUEUE IS FULL" 

"ONCE MORE TO CLEAR" 

"ONCE MORE TO DELETE" 

"ONCE MORE TO KILL" 



Most of these are self explanatory except for maybe the 
last five. "BAD BLOCK" refers to an illegal placement of the 
BLOCK MARKER characters while using the COPY BLOCK* MOVE BLOCK, 
or STORE BLOCK functions (4.2#, 4.21, 4.32, 4.33). "QUEUE IS 
FULL" means that you have tried to enter more than 13 file names 
in the PRINT QUEUE (4.36), "ONCE MORE TO CLEAR" is the warning 
message on the double acting RESET function (4.53). "ONCE MORE 
TO DELETE" is the warning message for the double acting DELETE 
BLOCK function (4.46). "ONCE MORE TO KILL" is the warning 
message on the double acting KILL FILE function (4.29). 



Page 16 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4. EDITING FUNCTIONS 



Editing -functions are those which assist the operator in 

preparing and manipulating text while it's still on the screen 
and in the computer's memory. These are -functions such as: 
moving a block, o-f text from one place to another, deleting) 
searching tor- a particular word(s), scrolling, or calling up a 
disk, directory, just to name a tew. 

The -following pages contain summaries of all 61 editing 
■functions available to the ZQRLOF user, how each is invoked! and 
an explanation of how each works. Most functions are invoked by 
holding down the CLEAR key and then striking one of the other 
keys. The SEARCH function is one example. It is denoted in 
this section like: 

CLEAR-S 



Others are invoked by holding the SHIFT key down and striking 
one of the other keys. For example, SCROLL UP will be denoted: 



SHIFT-* 



And still others like CURSOR RIGHT are invoked by a single key: 



Note: The following functions are not operative while the 
cursor is in either one of the STATUS LINES: 



4.11 DELETE CHARACTER 

4.12 DELETE CHARACTER BACKWARDS 
4.21 COPY BLOCK 

4.25 GET TEXT FROM DISK 

4.3e TAB 

4.31 DELETE LINE 

4.32 MOVE BLOCK 
4.34 OPEN LINE 
4.42 DELETE WORD 
4.44 SPLIT TEXT 
4.46 DELETE BLOCK 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 17 



4.1. CURSOR RIGHT -» 

The cursor is moved one column to the right. After the 

cursor has reached the last column of the line the cursor will 
then skip down to the first column of the next line. 



4.2. CURSOR LEFT «■ 

The cursor is moved one column to the left. No action is 
taken if the cursor is in the first column of the line. 



4.3. CURSOR UP * 

The cursor is moved one line up. If the cursor is on the 
top line of the display the text will be scrolled down instead. 



4.4. CURSOR DOWN + 

The cursor is moved one line down. If the cursor is on 

the bottom text line of the display the text will be scrolled up 

instead. 



4.5. CURSOR FAR RIGHT SHIFT--* 

The cursor is moved to one column past the last character 
of the line. This function can also be used to place the cursor- 
in the right most field of the STATUS LINES. 



Page 18 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.6. CURSOR FAR LEFT 



SHIFT-<- 



The cursor is moved to the first column of the line. This 
■function can also be used to place the cursor in the left most 
field of the STATUS LINES. 



4.7. SCROLL UP 

The text is scrolled up one line. 



SHIFT-*- 



4.8. SCROLL DOWN 

The text is scrolled down one line. 



SHIFT-* 



4.9. PAGE UP 



CLEAR-t 



The text is scrolled up thirteen lines if the maximum text 
width as set in the WIDTH FIELD is 64 characters or less, 6 
lines if greater than 64 (see 3.2). 



4.19. PAGE DOWN 

Same as 4.? except down instead of up. 



CLEAR-* 



EDITING FUNCTIONS 



Page 19 



4.11. DELETE CHARACTER CLEAR--* 

The character at the cursor is deleted and the text to the 
right o-f the cursor is shifted left one column to fill the gap. 
If the cursor- is to the right of the last character on the line 
then the cursor- will move to the first column of the next line. 
If the cursor is in the first column of a blank, line then all 
the text below the cursor will scroll up one line to fill the 
gap. 

Note: When the DELETE CHARACTER function is used on an expanded 
character! both the character and the vertical line in front of 
it (iHused to indicate that it's an expanded character, see 
4.43) are deleted. 



4.12. DELETE CHARACTER BACKWARDS CLEAR-*- 

Same as 4.11 except that the cursor is moved one column to 

the left first. No action is taken if the cursor is in the 
first column. 



4.13. LOWER CASE CLEAR-. 

An alpha character (A-Z) at cursor is changed to lower 

case (if not already) and the cursor is moved one column to the 

rig h t . 



4.14. UPPER CASE CLEAR-, 

An alpha character (A-Z) at cursor is changed to upper 

case (if not already) and the cursor is moved one column to the 
right. 



Page 2« ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.15, CAPITAL LOCK 



CLEAR-/ 



All alpha characters ( A - 2 ) entered after hitting 
CLEAR-ENTER will be in upper case. Hit CLEAR-ENTER a second 
time to terminate. 



4.16. PRINTER COMMAND CHARACTER 



CLEAR-, 



A PRINTER COMMAND character «) is entered at the cursor. 
All characters on the same line and -following this character- 
will be assumed by the printing routine in ZORLOF to be printer 
commands. Also* all lines starting with this character will be 
stripped from the text while PRINTING (4.35) or VIEWING (4.4i). 

Note: if the PRINTER COMMAND character is typed at some place 
other than the first character of a line, the WORD-WRAP and LINE 
JUSTIFICATION routines in ZORLOF will automatically put it, and 
the characters which follDw f on their own line as soon as that 
text is scrolled off and then scrolled-up back onto the screen, 
or when CLEAR-J is struck (4.28J. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS 



Page 2i 



4.17. SPECIAL FUNCTION CHARACTER SHIFT-Q 

The SPECIAL FUNCTION character (fc) is entered at the 
cursor. This character is used in conjunction with the SPECIAL 
FUNCTION printer command to "define" and "locate" special 
characters and printer functions within a line of text. This is 
explained in detail in section 5.27. 



4.18. PRINT SCREEN CLEAR-G 

The contents of the display screen is printed. This can 
be done while text is being edited» while text is being VIEWED 
(4.41), or while a DIRECTORY is on the screen <4.22). The 
STATUS LINES will not be printed in the case of the DIRECTORY. 
The type of printer assumed (parallel* serial, baud rate, etc.) 
will be that which was last specified when printing a text file 
(see 5.1, 5.2, and 5.3). If there was none previously 
specified, then the default is the parallel line printer. The 
function will terminate automatically when screen is fully 
printed, or manually by hitting CLEAR-Z. 



4.19. AUTOMATIC SEARCH AND REPLACE CLEAR-A 

All occurrences of the SEARCH string in the text, from the 
cursor down, are replaced by the REPLACE string. Terminate the 
function by hitting CLEAR-Z. See 3.6 and 3.7 for more 
information on how the SEARCH and REPLACE functions work. 



Page 22 ZORLQF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.2 d. BLOCK MARKER INSERT CLEAR-B 

A BLOCK MARKER character (¥) is inserted into the text 
just ahead of the cursor. Two such BLOCK MARKER characters must 
be used to define a block, of text, one for its beginning and one 
for its end, before the COPY BLOCK (4.21), MOVE BLOCK (4.32), or 
STORE BLOCK (4.33) functions can be implemented. Only one BLOCK 
MARKER character is needed when implementing the DELETE BLOCK 
function (4.46). 



4.21. COPY BLOCK CLEAR-C 

Once a block of text has been defined (4.28) that block. 
can be copied to any place in your text simply by moving the to 
that place and hitting CLEAR-C. The original black, will remain 
where it was and the block markers will be removed. 



4.22. DIRECTORY CLEAR-D 

At any time, whether text is on the screen or not, you can 
get a DIRECTORY of any disk, by hitting CLEAR-D. The DIRECTORY 
will give you a complete list of files found on any disk on your 
system, the length of each file in bytes and granules, the 
amount of free space of each disk in granules, and the PRINT 
QUEUE list (4.36). Upon hitting CLEAR-D the first directory to 
be displayed is the one for disk drive 0. The directory for any 
other drive can be examined just by hitting 0, i, 2, 3, etc. on 
the keyboard for the desired drive. 

Only 13 file names can be displayed on the screen at one 
time. By hitting the space bar on your keyboard, the next set 
of 13 from disk can be examined. To exit from the DIRECTORY 
function, hit CLEAR-Z and your text will return to the screen. 

Note: The same PRINT QUEUE list appears on the right side of 
the screen no matter what directory page is displayed on the 

left side of the screen. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 23 



4.23. END OF TEXT CLEAR-E 

The text is scrolled up until the last line appears at the 

bottom of the screen. The cursor is then moved to the first 

blank, line after the last line of text. 



4.24. FILE TEXT TO DISK CLEAR-F 

The text which is in the computer's memory and being 
displayed on the screen will be filed onto the disk, according to 
the file name as it appears in the name field of the STATUS LINE 
(3.1). To file the text to disk, as an "ASCII" file 
(non-ZORLOF-standard) the three characters "ASC" must be typed 
in the WIDTH FIELD prior to hitting CLEAR-F. See Appendix A for 
details on the differences of these two file types. Once filed, 
the text will appear back, on the screen so you can resume 
working on it. If you would like the display and memory to 
clear after the text is filed f this can be done by holding down 
both the SHIFT key and the CLEAR key while hitting the M F U key. 



4.2 5. GET TEXT FROM DISK CLEAR-G 

There are two ways to invoke this function. You may call 
a DIRECTORY to the screen (4.22) , move the cursor to the desired 
file name, and hit CLEAR-G. If there is text already in the 
computer's memory* then the new text will be inserted at the 
place where your cursor was just before you enacted the 
DIRECTORY function. If you get a second or third file at this 
time) they will be inserted following the ones before it. If 
there was no text in the computer's memory at the time* then the 
name and width of the first file will automatically be placed in 
their respective fields in the STATUS LINE (3.1, 3.2). 

The second way to invoke this function is to bypass the 
DIRECTORY and just type the name of the file on a blank line 
(see 4.34 to open a blank line) and hit CLEAR-G. The line 
containing the file name will be removed from the text and the 
file with that name will be read into the computer's memory just 
as it did in the DIRECTORY example. 

Note: File names must comply with the rules set forth in your- 
DQS operator's manual* must be left justified on the line in 
which they were typed* must be no longer than 14 characters 
including the extension and drive specification (if used)* and 
must not contain paswords. 



Page 24 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.2 6. HOME CURSOR CLEAR-H 

The cursor is moved to the first column of the top display 
line . 



4.27. INSERT CLEAR-I 

The cursor will blink, at a much slower rate to let you 
know that the INSERT function is active. As you type* all 
characters to the right of the cursor will be pushed right as 
characters are inserted at the cursor. As words reach the end 
of the cursored line they are automatically removed and put on 
the following line. The INSERT function can be terminated by 
hitting CLEAR-I a second time. 



4.28. REJUSTIFY CLEAR- J 

As you type you will notice that ZORLQF does a marvelous 
job of keeping all the text lines justified except for the one 
that the cursor is on. This was done intentionally so that the 
words on the line of test where you are typing would stay still, 
and not be jumping around every time you hit a key. 

This function, however, can be used to totally REJUSTIFY 
the section of text that is on the screen if you wish to see it 
in its fully justified form before moving on to another section 
of text. After hitting CLEAR-J, the text is removed from the 
screen and returned fully WORD-KRAPPED and LINE JUSTIFIED. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 25 



4.2?. KILL FILE ON DISK CLEAR-K 

Although this command (CLEAR-K) is invoked in the same way 
as the TAB function (4.3d), it's doubtful that you will get the 
two confused. The TAB function only works when there is text on 
the screen* and the KILL FILE function only works when a 
DIRECTORY is on the screen. 

To implement the KILL FILE functioni just call the 
DIRECTORY to the screen (4.22), position the cursor over the 
file you wish to eliminate from the disk, and hit CLEAR-K. The 
first time CLEAR-K is struck the "ONCE MORE TO CLEAR" message 
will flash on and off in the second STATUS LINE. If you change 
your mind at this point just hit any other key to abort. 
Hitting CLEAR-K a second time will remove the file from the 
disk. The DIRECTORY is then recalled, showing you that it is no 
longer listed in the directory. 

This function is especially useful if you need to file 
away to disk, the text you are working on but the diskette is 
already full. You can KILL something on the disk to make room 
for the new text file, without ever losing the text in the 

computer's memory. 



Page 26 ZORLQF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.38. TAB 



CLEAR-K 



The cursor- is moved to -the next TAB STOP position and TAB 
characters (-» will be written -from the point where the cursor 
was* up to the next TAB STOP. See section 5.4 for the setting 
of TAB STOPS. 



TAB characters function 
characters ($1(4.48) when being 
(4.41): both create extra spacing 
differences do exist. Each set of 
STOP to the next) is changed into 
when the file is written to disk., 
file from disk, all TAB ASCII CODES are automatically replaced 
by the appropriate number of TAB characters. The BLANK 
character* however* is always a BLANK character-! whether on the 
screen* in memory* or on the disk. 



very much like the BLANK 
PRINTED (4.35) or VIEWED 
between words. However- two 
TAB characters (from one TAB 
a single TAB ASCII CODE («9H> 
Likewise* when reading a text 



The other difference is in how 
printing in proportional-space mode, 
rule is simple* all characters are the 
character and each BLANK character 



the two are treated when 

In mono-space mode the 

same width and each TAB 

are printed as mono-space 



SPACE characters -- no problem. But* on a proportional-space 
printer* the distance from the last character before a TAB to 
the first character after a TAB can vary considerably from one 
line to the next* since the characters are not all the same 
width. ZORLOF precisely calculates this distance for each TAB 
insure 'that all the TAB STOPS line up straight 
The printed width of the BLANK character* on the 
set at some fixed value* which is inversely 
the value you set for the CHARACTER DENSITY 
not change from line to line. 



in each line to 

down the page, 
other hand* is 
proportional to 
(5.16), and does 



When using the TAB function, it is recommended that you do 
so only on lines that are set to JUSTIFY LEFT or JUSTIFY BOTH 
(2.2, 5.1 1). The meaning of a TAB in a line set to JUSTIFY 
RIGHT or JUSTIFY CENTER is obscure and the results would be 
unpredictable . 

For the use of this function while editing EDTASM or BASIC 
files see section 6.4 

Note: If this function is used while the DIRECTORY is on the 
screen* it will be interpreted as the KILL FILE command (4.2?) 
instead of the TAB command. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS 



Page 2? 



4,31. DELETE LINE CLEAR-L 

All the text from the cursor to the end of the line will 

be deleted. If the cursor is in the first column then the whole 

line will be deleted and the lines under the cursor will scroll 
up to fill the gap. 



4.32. MOVE BLOCK CLEAR-M 

Once a block of text is defined (4.20) that block can be 
moved to any place in your text by simply moving your cursor to 
that place and hitting CLEAR-M. Once the block is moved the 
block markers are removed. 



4.33. STORE FILE TO DISK CLEAR-N 

Once a block has been defined (4.28), that block can be 
written onto disk using this function. On a blank line (see 
4.34 to open a blank line), write the desired name you wish that 
black to be filed under, then hit CLEAR-N. A copy of that block 
will be written to disk under- that name, and the BLOCK MARKER 
characters* as well as the block's file name, will then be 
removed from the text. 

Note: File names must comply with the rules set forth in your 
DOS operator's manual, must be left justified on the line in 
which they were typed, must be no longer than 14 characters 
including the extension and drive specification (if used), and 
must not contain passwords. 



4.34. OPEN LINE CLEAR-0 

All text lines below the cursor are scrolled down to open 

one blank line. The cursor is then moved to the first column of 
the blank line. 



Page 28 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.35. PRINT TEXT 



CLEAR-P 



The text file will be sent to the printer in its final 
letter-quality form. See section 5 for details on printer 
initialling and print formatting. Once the text file that is 
in the computer's memory has been completely PRINTED, the 
function is terminated and the top portion of the text appears 
back, on the screen. The only exception to this is when there is 
one or more files in the PRINT QUEUE (4.36). In this case* 
after the first file is PRINTED* the memory is cleared* the next 
file in the PRINT QUEUE is read from disk, into memory, and it is 
PRINTED. The function will automatically terminate when the 
last file in the PRINT QUEUE is PRINTED, or manually by hitting 
CLEAR-Z. 



4.36. QUEUE FILES FOR PRINTING 



CLEAR-Q 



Up to 13 files can be registered 
calling the DIRECTORY to the screen 
cursor over the desired file name* and 
names of the files in the PRINT QUEUE 
First-In-First-Out order as seen on 
screen. Entries may be removed from the PRINT QUEUE by 
positioning the cursor over the file name in the PRINT QUEUE and 
hitting CLEAR-L. 



in the PRINT QUEUE by 

(4.22), positioning the 

hitting CLEAR-Q. The 

will then be entered in 

the right side of the 



EDITING FUNCTIONS 



Page 29 



4.37. SEARCH CLEAR-S 

The text will be SEARCHED from "the positon after the 
cursor down to find a string of characters that matches the 
string of characters you have typed in the SEARCH FIELD (3.6). 
If found) the cursor will stop at the -first character of that 
string. If not found f the cursor will stop on the next blank, 
line after the last line of your text. 



4.3 S. REPLACE CLEAR-R 

If the cursor is positioned at the start of a string of 
characters that matches the string of characters you have typed 
in the SEARCH FIELD (3.6)» those characters, upon hitting 
CLEAR-Ri will be REPLACED with a copy of the string of 
characters which you have typed in the REPLACE FIELD (3.7). If 
the characters in the SEARCH FIELD do not match those starting 
at the cursor position* nothing will happen. 



Page 30 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.39. TOP QF TEXT CLEAR-T 

The portion of your text which is currently on the screen 
is scrolled off the screen and the top portion of the text is 
scrolled onto the screen. 



4.40. UNDERLI NE CLEA R-U 

When CLEAR-U is struck the character at the cursor- is 
changed into a graphics character by the setting of the most 
significant bit of the 8 bit value that represents that 
character in the computer's memory. All such graphics 
characters will later be printed as their original character 
with an underline. The underline can be removed by putting the 
cursor back, over the character and hitting CLEAR-U again. 

There are four different ways to create underlines with 
ZORLOF. this is only one of them. It is recomended that you 
review all four- methods and then use the method(s) that you feel 
most comfortable with. The other three methods are described in 
sections 4.57, 5.18. and 5.27. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 31 



4.4 i. VIEW TEXT CLEAR-V 

Implementing this function will allow the user to VIEW his 
text in -final format with proper indents, page breaks* header 
lines, footer lines, page number lines* and page numbers 
installed! non-printing characters (END-OF-SENTENCE characters, 
TABS, BLANKS, and RETURNS) replaced by SPACES, printer command 
lines removed, and all text fully justified -- all without ever- 
printing it on paper. Because of the limitations of the TRS-80 
hardware, however, certain things like depth of margin, bold, 
underline, superscript and subscript cannot be displayed on the 
screen during VIEWING and must be printed to be seen. 

Hitting the DOWN ARROW key (+> will cause the text to 
scroll forward one line. Holding this key down will cause 
continuous scrolling. If desired, you can scroll to a certain 
place in your text, then hit CLEAR-P, and all the rest of your 
text, from the last line displayed on your screen through to the 
end, will be printed on your printer. Also, if desired, you may 
get a print-out of just what is on the screen at any time by 
hitting CLEAR-8 (4. 18). Terminating the VIEW function is done 
by hitting CLEAR-Z. 

Note: It is not possible to scroll backwards through the text 
while implementing the VIEW function. 



4.42. DELETE WORD CLEAR- W 

All characters from the nearest space to the left of the 
cursor through the nearest space to the right of the cursor are 
deleted. All characters on the cursored line to the right of 
those deleted are then shifted left to fill in the gap. If the 
cursor is on a SPACE while trying to implement the DELETE WORD 
function, nothing will happen. 



Page 32 ZDRLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.43, EXPANDED CHARACTERS CLEAR-X 

When the EXPANDED CHARACTER function is active, all 
characters typed will appear on the screen as a thin disjointed 
line ()) followed by the character you type. All text entered 
this way will get printed on your printer as an expanded 
character, provided your printer has that capability. Of the 
printers that ZORLOF supports, the printer types that have the 
capability of printing EXPANDED characters are: Ei, K2, K3, K4» 
K5, K6» K? ( K8, K9, K19, and K28 (5.1). If your printer is not 
one of these then it will be printed as a space followed by the 
normal -width character. Terminating the EXPANDED CHARACTER 
function is done by hitting CLEAR-X a second time. 

Note: The following characters will be displayed on the screen 
as single-width characters even if the EXPANDED CHARACTER 
function is active: BLANK characters (1), END-DF-SENTENCE 
characters (->, TAB characters <-», PRINTER COMMAND characters 
(<>, RETURN characters iir), SUPERSCRIPT characters (+), 
SUBSCRIPT characters (+), and SPACES ( ). 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 33 



4.44. SPLIT TEXT 



CLEAR-Y 



If you have a need to insert type at a certain place in 
your text, but you want to do it with a blank screen* then this 
is the function you want to use. Move the cursor to the place 
you want to insert the text and hit CLEAR-Y. All text before 
the cursor scrolls up and off the screen, and all text at and 
following the cursor scrolls down and off the screen. 

Even though this is not a function that you have to 
terminate, you will have to do something to get your disjointed 
segments of text into one piece again. This can be done by 
either scrolling down an excess of 14 lines then scrolling up 
the same distance, or by hitting CLEAR-J (4.28). 



4.45. TERMINATE FUNCTION 



CLEAR-Z 



The following functions are terminated by hitting 
CLEAR-Z: 



4.16 PRINT SCREEN (CLEAR-S) 

4.19 AUTOMATIC SEARCH AND REPLACE (CLEAR- A) 

4.22 DIRECTORY (CLEAR-D) 

4.35 PRINT TEXT (CLEAR-P) 

4.37 SEARCH (CLEAR- S) 

4.41 VIEW TEXT (CLEAR-V) 



4.4 6. DELETE BLOCK 



CLEAR-* 



The first time this key is struck, the "ONCE MORE TO 
DELETE" message will flash on and off on the second STATUS 
LINE. If you change your mind at this point just hit any other 
key to abort. Hitting CLEAR-* a second time will cause all the 
text from the cursor to the next BLOCK MARKER character (4.2») 
to be deleted. 



Page 34 



ZQRLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



m 



• 



4.47. RETURN CHARACTER ENTER 

The RETURN character «-) is entered at the cursor and the 
cursor is moved to the first column of the next line. Any text, 
which was to the right of the cursor before the ENTER key was 
strucki will also move down to the next line. 

Use the RETURN character- to terminate a paragraph, or a 
BASIC or an EDTASK statement line, or at any time when you want 
the text on the line below the cursor to stay separate from the 
cursored line. If the RETURN character is not used to terminate 
short lines the LINE JUSTIFICATION function in ZORLOF will, 
during scrolling, fill each line with as much text that will fit 
before starting a new line. 

Note: The RETURN character is one of the characters which is 
not displayed while implementing the VIEW TEXT (4.41) or- the 
PRINT TEXT (4.35) functions. 



4.4 8. BLANK CHARACTER CLEAR-SPACE 

A BLANK character (!) is entered at the cursor. This 
character is special in that it is treated as a hard character 
(non-space) by ZQRLOF'5 LINE JUSTIFICATION function but as a 
SPACE by it's PRINT TEXT function. It is quite useful in 
putting extra spaces between words that the LINE JUSTIFICATION 
function will not close up and yet is displayed as a SPACE by 
while VIEWING (4,41) or PRINTING (4.35) text. 

Printing in mono-space mode, the width of the BLANK is the 
same as all the other characters. However, in 
proportional-space mode, the width of the BLANK will always be 
1.25/CHARACTER DENSITY. In other words, if you specify a 
CHARACTER DENSITY of i» characters per inch (5.16), a BLANK will 
be printed .125 inches wide. This width, once established by 
the CHARACTER DENSITY specification, will never decrease or 
increase the way a SPACE does in justifying a line to both 
margins. Therefore, a line that contains many BLANKS and few or 
no SPACES may actually be too long to justify in 
proportional-space mode, since each BLANK is 25% larger than the 
average character is supposed to be for that line. For this 
reason it is r-ecomended that if printing in proportional-space 
mode, all long strings of BLANKS in your text alternate one 
BLANK, one SPACE, one BLANK, one SPACE, etc. If this is done 
the SPACES will decrease in size to compensate for the over-sued 
nature of the BLANKS, and the line will justify properly. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 35 



4.4 7. ENB-OF-SENTENCE CHARACTER CLEAR-ENTER 

The END-OF-SENTENCE character <-> is entered at the 
cursor. Use this character to create an additional amount of 
space between sentences. This character functions exactly like 
the BLANK character (iS) except for one respect. If this 
character -falls at the end o-f a line during PRINTING (4.35) or 
VIEWING (4.41) and the line justification is JUSTIFY BOTH (2.2, 
5.1i)» this character not only becomes invisible* as a BLANK 
character would, but the line is rejustified to extend it out to 
meet the right margin. 



4.5 e. STATUS LINE HOME CLEAR-= 

The cursor is moved to the first unprotected column of the 
top STATUS LINE. 



4.51. LEFT BRACKET CHARACTER SH1FT~< 

A LEFT BRACKET «) is entered at the cursor when editing 

ZORLOF or- "ASCII" files. The LEBS-THAN (<) sign is entered at 
the cursor when editing EDTASM or BASIC files. 



4.52. RIGHT BRACKET CHARACTER SHIFT-> 

A RIGHT BRACKET (>) is entered at the cursor when editing 

ZORLOF or "ASCII" files. The GREATER-THAN sign <» is entered 
at the cursor when editing EDTASM or BASIC files. 



4.53. RESET CLEAR-G 

The first time this key is struck, the "ONCE MORE TO CLEAR" 
message flashes on and off on the second STATUS LINE. IF you 
change your mind at this point just hit any other key to abort. 
Hitting CLEAR-B a second time will cause the screen and the 
memory to clear and the STATUS LINES to re-initialize. 



Page 36 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.54. SUPERSCRIPT CHARACTER CLEAR- 1 

An UP ARROW <*> is entered at the cursor. This character- 
should be used in the text any time a character(s) needs to be 
printed half a line feed above the base line, like: X 2 . The 
actual character to be SUPERSCRIPTED must be de-fined in a 
SUPER/SUBSCRIPT printer- command (5.26). For more than one 
character in a row to be SUPERSCRIPTED, just put that number o-f 
UP ARROWS in a row in the text. To SUPERSCRIPT with an expanded 
character (4.43), just type the expanded character in a 
SUPER/SUBSCRIPT printer- command, then put two up arrows in the 
text where you want the expanded character to appear. 

Note: Of the printers that ZORLOF supports, those that have the 

capability of printing SUPERSCRIPTS and SUBSCRIPTS are: K2, K3, 

K5, K6, K?, K8, K9, Ki», Kit, K12, K13, K14, Ki5, Ki6, and K29 
(5.1). 



4.55. SUBSCRIPT CHARACTER CLEAR-2 

This function has the same purpose and operates the same 
as the SUPERSCRIPT CHARACTER function (4.54) except that the 
character displayed on the screen is a DOWN ARROW (+) and is 
used to locate characters that will be SUBSCRIPTED. 



4.56. RENUMBER CLEAR-3 

This function only works when the text being edited is a 
BASIC file or an EDTASM file. The renumbering starts at i« and 
counts up by i0's. In both the BASIC and EDTASM files the 
renumbering is done by stripping off all leading numeric 
characters on each line, then inserting the appropriate number- 
value. However, EDTASM files will always end up with five-digit 
line numbers, but the line numbers on BASIC files will only be 
as many digits as they have to be. For example: Line number 10 
will be "OMit" in EDTASM files and H ie" in BASIC files. 

Note: This function will only reassign line numbers. It will 
not change the GOTO and GOSUB statements in your BASIC text 
files. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Page 3? 



4.57. UNDERLINED SPACE CHARACTER CLEAR-4 

An UNDERLINE character (_) is entered at the cursor. Use 
this character instead af the alternate methods of underlining 
(4.49, 5.18, 5.2?) for when you want just an underline with no 
character above it as with fill-in-the-bank forms and such. 



4.58. ZAP-PROCESSING p+CtAjL*' S^> 7>^S/>OS, V^«-*- e "f*ft 7&CLEAR " 6 

Many of you are computer hackers and will find great value 
in this unique feature of 2DRL0F. Even those of you who are 
nott will find this feature quite powerful and simple to use* if 
you choose to take advantage of it. ZAP-PROCESSING as we call 
it f will allow you to edit (patch) machine code program files by 
displaying the data in HEX-ASCII format. A portion of what an 
earlier version of ZORLOF looks like displayed in this format is 
shown on the next page. The first set 4 digits on each data 
line is that line's relative address (offset) in the file. The 
second set of 32 digits is the hexidecimal representation of the 
16 bytes at that relative address. The third set of 16 
characters is the ASCII representation of those same 16 bytes. 

To implement the function just move the cursor to the file 
name in the directory, like you would to load the file normally 
(4.25), but this time you hit CLEAR-6. The file will then 
appear on the screen in "ZAP" format and look something like the 
example on the next page. You may wish to try this on a program 
file like ZORLDF/CMD just see it for yourself. Once the file is 
displayed in this format you may scroll to any place in the file 
and change anything you want about the file. Only changes made 
in the data field (middle section), however, will affect the 
file. You can even get a print-out of the file in this format 
with CLEAR-P (4.35). When finished, the file can be written 
back to disk with CLEAR-F (4.24). Deletes have been disallowed 
in this function to prevent accidental corruption of the file. 

From time to time ANITEK may issue patches to ZDRLOF; and 
this is the way you will be able to install them yourself. In 
Appendix B of this manual there are listed a few patches that 
deal with items of personal preference which you may make to 
ZORLOF/CMD if you think they apply to you. Do not make any 
patches to the master ZORLOF disk, or the master of any other 
program for that matter. To insure backup, always make patches 
to a copy of that program. 



Page 38 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



EXAMPLE OF ZAP FORMAT 



0008 


0586 


5A4F 


5231 


3358 


0100 


4C59 


0000 


0008 


. .Z0R13X. ,LY. . . . 


0810 
0020 


0000 
0008 


0000 
20F6 


0000 

0528 


0000 

F311 


000 


0000 


0000 


8888 




5155 


CD13 


0028 


8FCD 


. . v. s.QUM. . .M 


0030 


3300 


FE0D 


20F1 


CD15 


55C2 


3040 


18E9 


FE1C 


3.~. qM.UB0@.i~. 


0040 


CA2D 


40FE 


1DCA 


2D40 


C34C 


554C 


494E 


4528 


J-e~.J-@CLUt_lNE 


0050 


2054 


5908 


1151 


55CD 


1C44 


C23A 


55 1A 


FE2A 


TY. .QUM.DB:U.~* 


0060 


CA3A 


55CD 


3844 


CA2D 


48C3 


4C55 


1151 


55CD 


JiUM0DJ-@CLU.QUM 


0070 


1C44 


C23A 


55 1A 


FE2A 


CA3A 


5506 


8021 


0056 


.DBiU.~SJjU. .! .V 


0080 


CD24 


44C2 


4C55 


1151 


55CD 


1300 


200C 


CD3B 


Mf-DBLU , QUM . . .M; 


0090 


00CO 


1555 


C238 


48C3 


C659 


F53E 


0DCD 


3B80 


.M.UB8@CFYu>.M;. 


00A0 


FIFE 


1CCA 


2D40 


FE1D 


CA2D 


40C3 


4C55 


2100 


q~.J-@~.J-eCLU! . 


08B0 
00C0 


2100 

C33C 


2100 

5AC3 


2100 

425A 


2100 

C348 


2100 

SACS 


2108 
4F5A 


2180 


2100 


i i i \ i i i i 


C358 


SACS 


CXZCBZCHZCOZCXZC 


08D0 


5E5A 


C377 


5AC3 


AD5A 


C3BF 


5AC3 


ED5A 


C31E 


'ZCwZC-ZC?ZCmZC. 


00E0 


5BC3 


295B 


C32F 


5BC3 


3B5B 


C344 


5BC3 


4D5B 


tC) [C/ECjCCDLCML 


00F0 


C357 


5BC3 


655B 


C336 


5AC3 


395A 


78B1 


C8ED 


CNtCe[C6ZC9ZxlHm 


0100 


B0C9 


78B1 


C8ED 


B8C? 


C54F 


0188 


4A5A 


0680 


0IxlHm8IEO. .JZ. . 


0110 


09C1 


C9C5 


4F06 


00B7 


ED42 


C1C9 


B7ED 


4244 


.AIEO. ,7mBAI7mBD 


120 


4 DC? 


D5C5 


1100 


884F 


0608 


B728 


0AB7 


ED42 


MIUE. . .0, .7( .7mB 


130 


3803 


1318 


F809 


7DEB 


C1D1 


C9DD 


2 IAD 


5AC5 


8. . .x.JKAQI] !-ZE 


8140 


DD2B 


DD2B 


0D20 


F9C1 


3E80 


C5DD 


4E00 


DD23 


3+3+. yA>.E3N.3# 


150 


DD46 


00DD 


233C 


12B7 


ED42 


38F9 


3D09 


C638 


3F.HK.7mB8y=.F8 


160 


1213 


C10D 


20E2 


C918 


27E8 


8364 


000A 


0001 


. .A. bl .'h.d. . . . 


0170 


88D5 


C5CD 


775A 


C1E1 


0DC8 


7EFE 


30C0 


3620 


,UEMwZAa.H""0@6 


0180 


2318 


F5D5 


C506 


05EB 


2100 


00 1A 


FE20 


2003 


»,uue. .k! . . .~ . 


0190 


1318 


F8CD 


1E5B 


28 16 


E60F 


0E0A 


D511 


8000 


. . xM . C . -f . . . U . . . 


1A0 


EB1? 


0D20 


FC5F 


1688 


19D1 


1305 


20DD 


C1D1 


Y. . . _. . -Q. . 3AQ 


01B0 


C97D 


FE60 


D44D 


5BD6 


30FE 


0A38 


02D6 


07FE 


n~TM[V0~.8.V.~ 


01C0 


1838 


1C6F 


7CFE 


60D4 


4D5B 


D630 


FE0A 


3802 


.0.0 "TMCY0".8. 


1D0 


D607 


FE10 


3009 


0707 


0787 


E6F0 


B5BF 


C9F6 


V.~.8 f p5?Iv 


1E0 


FFC9 


FE30 


D8FE 


3A38 


02B7 


C9BF 


C9EB 


CD48 


.I~8X~:8.7I?IkMH 


01F0 


5AEB 


C978 


B1C8 


7E12 


3620 


2313 


0B18 


F4FE 


ZKIxlH~.6 tt. ..t~ 


0288 


61D8 


FE7B 


D0D6 


20 C9 


FE4 1 


D8FE 


0188 


485B 


aX~<PV 1"AX". .HI 


0210 


5BD0 


C620 


C9FE 


41D8 


FE5B 


38E7 


C620 


C9D5 


[PF l~AX~[0gF 1U 


0220 


EB21 


0800 


B728 


0419 


3D28 


FCD1 


C9FE 


3038 


k!..7(..= QI~88 


0230 


14FE 


3A38 


16FE 


4138 


8CFE 


4738 


0EFE 


6138 


. " : 8 . ~A8 . "68 . ~a8 


8240 


04FE 


6738 


06C5 


4704 


B8C1 


C9BF 


C-905 


5CB8 


,'-q8.EG.8AI?I .\8 


0250 


3205 


5C7E 


FE29 


2867 


FE2C 


28A6 


C339 


5CCD 


2.\~~> <g~,<&C9\M 


0260 


D15B 


C239 


5C3A 


8D5C 


F608 


320D 


5C18 


E4CD 


Q[B9\: .\v.2.\.dM 


0278 


D15B 


CA39 


5CE5 


1155 


51CD 


D158 


226A 


51E1 


Q[J9\e.UQMQP",iQa 


8288 


0682 


18C8 


CDD1 


5BCA 


395C 


E5U 


5551 


CDD1 


. . .HMQ[J9\e.UGMQ 


8290 


5022 


6851 


E106 


0418 


B323 


7EFE 


0DC8 


FE29 


P"hQa. . .3* — .H~) 


2A6 


C8FE 


2CC8 


FE3D 


28F1 


2311 


5551 


0608 


D5C5 


H~,H~= qtt.UQ. .UE 


0288 


3E28 


1213 


10FC 


C1D1 


CD81 


502B 


F68 1 


C9ED 


> . . . AQM.P+v.Im 


82C8 


4B57 


55CD 


C14A 


C24C 


4061 


6263 


6465 


6667 


KNUMAJBLSabcdefq 


02D0 


6869 


6A6B 


6C6D 


6E6F 


7071 


7273 


7475 


7677 


hi jk.l mnopqrstuvw 


02E8 


787? 


7A88 


8888 


8000 


3031 


3233 


3435 


3637 




82F8 


3839 


3A3B 


2C2D 


2E2F 


8800 


0080 


8182 


8320 


07 « J }" mf ■■«•■■• 


0308 


0000 


0000 


00 


0000 


6041 


4243 


4445 


100 





EDITING FUNCTIONS 



Page 3? 



4.59. reserved for -future release CLEAR-7 



4.6«. reserved for future release (^^tU»J tf/f/f"*/' CLEAR-8 



Page 40 ZORLQF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



4.61. CANCEL KEYBOARD CLICK CLEAR-? 

The use of the cassette relay within the expansion 
interface to produce a gentle click when a key is struck is to 
give the operator an audible feedback mechanism reassuring him 
that the key-stroke had been seen and processed. If for any 
reason you prefer not to take anvantage of this feature you may 
override it by hitting CLEAR-?. 



EDITING FUNCTIONS Pa 9 e 41 



THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY 
LEFT BLANK 



Page 42 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5. PRINTER COMMANDS 



PRINTER COMMANDS are used to tell ZORLOF how to format the 
text that is to printed. Margin size, right and left side text 
indenting* line spacing, position of header line, and type style 
are examples of the many PRINTER COMMANDS available to you you. 

PRINTER COMMANDS are found in what is known as PRINTER 
COMMAND LINES. Each PRINTER COMMAND LINE must begin with a 
PRINTER COMMAND CHARACTER «M4.i<S) and end with a RETURN 
character «-M4.47>, and each PRINTER COMMAND within the line 
must be separated from the other- PRINTER COMMANDS with commas 
(,). These PRINTER COMMANDS are visible in the text while the 
text is being edited, but are stripped out while the text is 
being PRINTED (4.35) or VIEWED (4,41), 

In the following pagesi all the various PRINTER COMMANDS 
are summarized and examples of each are given. An expression 
showing the standard format of each PRINTER COMMAND is listed to 
the right of each PRINTER COMMAND name. The upper case 
characters in the expressions are the "constants", the 
characters which define the PRINTER COMMAND type, and will not 
change. The lower case characters in the expressions are the 
"variables", where you, the user, can specify a value or a 
string of characters that will be associated with that command 
from that point on, or until the command is used again somewhere 
else in the text. Even though, in the standard command format 
expressions, the constants are upper case and the variables are 
lower case for- clarity in explanation, the constants and the 
variables of any PRINTER COMMAND can actually be typed in either 
upper or lower- case, whichever is easiest for you. 

Even though there are 39 different PRINTER COMMMANDS in 
all, you need not let that number overwhelm you. ZORLOF is 
indeed a very simple word processing system to use. You can 
actually create and print out text without ever using any 
PRINTER COMMANDS. Try it to prove it to yourself. The internal 
defaults for each function will take over when the PRINTER 
COMMANDS are absent. But if there is something special you need 
a word prcessor to do, it is altogether- likely that ZORLOF can 
do it using one of the following PRINTER COMMANDS. 

Caution: There is no error- checking on PRINTER COMMANDS. Be 
careful to follow the examples -- don't leave anything out, 
don't add anything, and don't change anything, unless it's 
stated that you can. Improper PRINTER COMMANDS will result in a 
misinterpretation of that command and often the one following 
it, as well. 

Note: The periods in the examples (...) are to show which 
commands can be followed by or preceded by other commands, and 
which ones cannot. They are not part of actual commands. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 43 



5.1. PRINTER TYPE Kn 



Use this printer command to specify which type of printer 
you own. This is the only way ZORLOF knows which control codes 
to use in order to control the various functions of your 
printer. The printers which are supported by ZORLDF are listed 
below along with the printer type commands used to specify 
them. The default for- this function is "K9". 



K® Undefined (assumes your printer has no special 
abilities). 

Ki OKIDATA Microline 88, OKIDATA Microline 82A, 
and OKIDATA Microline 83A (mono-space 
operation). 

K2 Centronics 737, Centronics 739, and Radio Shack 
Line Printer IV (mono-space operation). 

K3 Centronics 737, Centronics 739, and Radio Shack 
Line Printer IV ( p r o p o r t i o n a 1 - s p a c e 
operation). 

K4 EPSON MX-S9, MX-88 with Graftrax, EPSON MX -109, 
and EPSON MX-199 with Graftrax (mono-space 
operation). 

K5 EPSON MX-89 with GraftraxPlus, EPSON MX-199 
with GraftraxPlus (mono-space operation). 

K6 NEC PC-8923A-C, C. ITOH Prowiter 8519., and Tec 
8599R (mono-space operation). 

K? NEC PC-8923A-C (proportional-space operation). 

K8 C. ITOH Prowriter 8519 (proportional-space 
operation) . 

K9 Tec 8509R (proportional-space operation). 

K19 Radio Shack Daisy Wheel II (mono-space 
operation) . 

Kil Radio Shack Daisy Wheel II (proportional-space 
operation) . 



Page 44 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



K12 C. ITOH Starwriter FF-i5ee f C. ITOH Starwriter F-iG, 
NEC Spinwriter 5515, NEC Spinwriter 5525. Diablo 636, 
Qume ( and most other daisy wheel printers (mono-space 
operation). 

K13 C. ITOH Starwriter FP-1566, NEC Spinwriter 5515, NEC 
Spinwriter 5525, Diablo 636, Qume, and most other 
daisy wheel printers (proportional-space operation). 

Ki4 C. ITOH Starwriter F-10 <pr opor ti on a 1 - spa c e 

operation) . 

K15 NEC Spinwriter 5516 and NEC Spinwriter 5529 

(mono-space operation.) 

K16 NEC Spinwriter 5510 and NEC Spinwriter 5526 

(proportional-space operation.) 

K17 Brother HR-i and CQMREX ComRiter- CR-i (mono-space 
operation) . 

K18 SMITH-CORONA TP-i (mono-space operation). 

K19 Radio Shack. Line Printer VI (mono-space operation). 

K28 EPSON MX-86 with GraftraxPlus, and EPSON MX-166 with 
GraftraxPlus (proportional- space operation). 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . , K7 , . . . +- 

This command specifies that the text is going to be printed on 

an NEC PC-8623A-C printer in proportional-space mode. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 45 



5.2. AUTOMATIC LINE-FEED INSERTION LF 



With ZORLOF you have the option of choosing between having 
each printed line terminated by a CARRIAGE-RETURN and a 
LINE-FEED or just a CARRIAGE-RETURN. Which you choose will 
depend on whether or not your printer can be con-figured to 
accept both the CARRIAGE-RETURN and the LINE-FEED for the line 
termination) and by the printer configuration requirements o-f 
your other programs. The default for. this function is 
CARRIAGE-RETURN only. 

Note: If your printer is one that is incapable of reverse 
LINE-FEEDS (KB, Ki, K4, and K18; see 5.1) we recommend that this 
command be used and the printer be configured to accept both the 
CARRIAGE-RETURN and the LINE-FEED from the host computer. Else, 
-functions that normally require overstrilting, such as SUPPRESS 
LINE-FEED, BOLD, and UNDERLINE, may not work properly on your 
printer. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . , LF , . . . *- 

In this example all the text lines will be terminated by sending 

a CARRIAGE-RETURN and a LINE-FEED to the printer. 



Page 46 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.3. BAUD RATE FOR SERIAL PRINTERS Rn 



If "this command is specified it is assumed that your- 
printer is connected to the serial port of your computer. H 
this command is not specified it is assumed that your printer is 
connected to the parallel printer port on your computer. The 8 
different -forms of this command and the baud rates which they 
represent are listed in the table below. 



Rl 


lie 


baud 


R2 


158 


baud 


R3 


388 


baud 


R4 


<$ee 


baud 


R5 


1288 


baud 


R6 


2488 


baud 


R7 


4888 


baud 


R8 


9688 


baud 



Note: The baud rate inside your- printer has to be set the same. 
Consult the operator's manual that came with your printer. 



Example: <"..." means possible other commands) 

<... f R4,...+- 

This command specifies a serial printer running at 688 baud» 
rather than a parallel printer. 

For smoothest and fastest printing » vve recommend that you 
set your printer at the highest BAUD rate that it is capable of 
running at. 



• 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 4? 



5.4. SETTING OF TABS TABa;b;c;d;e;f 

This printer command is used to set the tab stops for both 
editing and printing. The letters in the expression (a-f...) 
are the tab stop locations relative to the left most column of 
the line. These must be specified in ascending order within the 
command. As many as 15 tab stops can be specified. This 
command will become active on the screen for editing once 
entered and CLEAR-T (4.39) has been struck. The default for 
this command is: 

<TAB6; 14; 22; 30; 38; 46 j 54 5 62 ; 70 5 78; 86; 94; 162; 1 18 ; 1 18+- 

Note: All the stops within the command are separated by 
semicolons ";" not commas. 

Caution: For proper operation no more than one TAB STOP 
command sould be made per file and it should be located within 
the text file ahead of any printed text. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<.. . , TAB 10 ; 17;21;28;35;42;49;56,. ..*- 

The first tab stop is 10 columns in from the left side f the 
second is 17 columns in from the left sidei ...» the last one is 
56 columns in from the left side. 



Page 48 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.5. INDIVIDUAL SHEET PAUSING 



If you are -feeding your printer with individual sheets 
instead of a continuous roll or a box of -fan -fold paper, then 
you will want to use this command. Each time the print head 
reaches the line number on the page that you have specified as 
the length of the paper <5.6)» the printing will pause. This 
gives you the opportunity to remove that sheet -from the printer 
and put a new one in without losing any text. To restart the 
printer at the point where you left off* either hit the space 
bar on the keyboard or- turn the on-line switch off and back. on. 
This action will have to be taken before ZORLOF will continue 
printing any sheet of that file - even the first sheet . The 
default for this function is that the individual sheet pausing 
is not active. 

Caution: If you own a serial printer and want to feed it 
individual sheets it is necessary that the command specifying 
the serial printer (5.3) comes before this command or- improper- 
operation will result. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<. . . ,1 , ...«- 

This command activates the single sheet pausing function. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 49 



5.6. SHEET SIZE SET Yn 



This command is used to set the SHEET SIZE of the paper on 
your printer. The "n" in the expression is the length in number- 
of lines. The default for this function is "Y66". 



Example: {"..." means possible other commands) 
<. . . ,Y48» . . .*- 

This specifies a SHEET SIZE of 48 lines long, or- 8 inches long 

assuming 6 lines per inch spacing (standard). 



Page 50 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.7. TOP TEXT LINE SET Tn 



This printer command establishes on which line, counting 
from the top of the page, the body of the text will begin. The 
"n" in the expression is that line number, 1 being the very top 
o-f the page. The default for this function is "T7". 

Caution: The number- that you assign for the TOP TEXT LINE must 

be less than or equal to the number you assign for the END TEXT 
LINE (5.8), and must be greater than G. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<. ..,T?, . . .+• 

In this example the text body will begin approximately 1.5 
inches below the top of the page, assuming 6 lines per inch 
spacing (standard). 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 51 



5.8. END TEXT LINE SET En 



This command is just like the TOP TEXT LINE SET printer 
command (5.7) t except that it specifies on which line the last 
line of the text body will be printed. The default for this 
function is "E62". 

Caution-- The number that you assign for the END TEXT LINE must 
be greater than or equal to the number you assign for the TOP 
TEXT LINE (5.?)i and must be less than or equal to the number 
you assign for the SHEET SIZE (5.6). 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

% • • • 1 WW 1 % • • * » 

In this example the text body will end approximately 9.5 inches 
below the top of the page, assuming 6 lines per inch spacing 
(standard). 



Example: ("..," means possible other commands) 

<. . . ,T1,E1,Y1, . . .«- 

This set of commands will allow you to print out any number of 
text lines with out any paper waste at the top or bottom (no top 
or bottom margin. 



Page 52 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.9. TEXT LEFT MARGIN MOn,MEn 



This printer- command will consist of either- "MO" followed 
by a value "n" to specify the width of the left side margin on 
odd numbered pages» or "ME" followed by a value "n" to specify 
the width of the left margin on the even numbered pages. Both 
must be specified or the default (M08 f ME8) will be assumed. The 
unit of measure for "n" is either tenths of an inch if you are 
printing in proportional-space modef or the unit of measure is 
character widths if you are printing in mono-space mode. 



Example: ("..." means possible other- commands) 

<... T M012, . . . ,ME6, . ..<- 

In this exampld the left mar-gin width is 1.2 inches on the odd 

numbered pages and .6 inches on the even numbered pages, if you 
are printing in proportional-space mode. Otherwise* the left 
margins in this example will be 12 character widths and 6 
character- widths, respectively. The actual width of the 
character depends on the type of printer you own and whether you 
are printing in EXPANDED (5.13), CONDENSED (5.14), or NORMAL 
(5.15) width character mode. Consult the operator's manual that 
came with your printer for this information. 



PRINTER COMMANDS ' Page 53 



5. 1 e. LINE SPACING 



Ln 



The M n" in this expression is to be set to the desired 
spacing o-f the text lines -- "i" for single spaced-lines, "2" 
for double-spaced* etc. No value for "n" less than i. greater 
than ii, or greater- than the number- you specified as the SHEET 
SIZE <5.6) is allowed. The default for this function is "Ll u . 

Note: Improper- matching of the AUTOMATIC LINE-FEED INSERTION 
printer command (5.2) with the configuration of your printer 
will result in improper line spacing. If you are getting double 
spacing when you specified single spacing* it is probably 
because you are using the "LF" command (5.2) and shouldn't be. 



Example; ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . ,L2, . . .«- 
In this example the text lines will be printed double-spaced. 



Page 54 



ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.11. JUSTIFY MODE SET Jx 



This printer command lets you specify which of 4 possible 
LINE JUSTIFICATION modes you want the text to be printed in. 



JL Justify text lines to the left margin, 
JR Justify text lines to the right margin. 

JB Justify text lines to both the left and right 

margins. 

JC Center the text between the left and right 
margins. 



These 4 different commands will not only dictate the way 
the text will justify on the page as it is being PRINTED (4.35). 
but will also cause the text to justify accordingly on the 
screen while the text is being VIEWED (4.4 i)» as well as while 
you are editing it. The line containing the command must* 
however* be scrolled off the screen then brought back, onto the 
screen by scrolling up in order to set the LINE JUSTIFICATION 
mode for that portion of text while you are editing it. Hitting 
CLEAR-T (4.3?) is one way of achieving these results. The 
default JUSTIFY mode for PRINTING, VIEWING, and editing is 
"JL". 

Note: While PRINTING or VIEWING text that is set to JUSTIFY 
RIGHT (JR). lines terminated by RETURN characters («-) will be 
justified fully to the right margin after the RETURN character 
has been stripped. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

Mares eat oats,*- 

\. . a . J JR , • ■ • *" 

And does eat oats,«- 

< . . . , JB, . . .*- 
And little 1 ambs 

< . . . , JC, . . .<- 
eat ivy.*- 

This will be printed: 

Mares eat oats. 

And does eat oats, 
And little lambs 

eat ivy. 



PRINTER COMMANDS * Page 55 



5.12. LEFT AND RIGHT SIDE TEXT INDENTING ILn,IRn 



These two printer- commands can be used to achieve text 
widths which are less than the maximum (set in the WIDTH FIELD, 
see 3.2)i by specifying an additional amount of indenting on the 
left or right sides or both. The "n" in the expressions is the 
number of character widths of indenting desired. This is often 
useful in highlighting certain paragraphs by causing them to be 
narrower than the rest of the text body. Full justification is 
maintained on all indented portions of text. The default for 
this function is u IL0,IRe". 

Note: The LEFT SIDE TEXT INDENT is in addition to the TEXT LEFT 
MARGIN as described in section 5,9. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 



'he -following letter was received by our 
branch office in Chicago. «- 
<. . . .ILSjIRSjGRl,. . .«- 
Dear Sirs,«- 

j£liS£Thank you -for your help in 
locating the parts that I needed. I 
will be doing more business with 
you in the -future. <- 

Sincerel y,«- 
Jack Thomson*- 
<. . . ,IL0,IR0,GR1,. . .<- 

WSICongratulations Chicago! It's happy 

customers like this one that have kept us 
going strong. *- 

This will be printed: 

The following letter- was received by our 
branch office in Chicago. 

Dear Sirs* 

Thank you for your help in 

locating the parts that I needed. I 

will be doing more business with 

you in the future. 

Sincerely, 
Jack Thomson 

Congratulations Chicago! It's happy 
customers like this one that have kept us 
going strong. 



Page 56 ZORLOF 4 OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.13. EXPANDED WIDTH CHARACTERS 



W 



Use this printer command if you want your text to be 
printed in EXPANDED width character mode* provided your printer 
has this capability. If your printer is type K2, K3 f K4 t K5, 
K6, K7, K8, K9, K19, op K2« (5.1), you can also print in what is 
known as CONDENSED-EXPANDED character mode. To achieve this 
type style just use this printer command along with the 
CONDENSED width character- printer- command (5.14). Terminate 
both the EXPANDED and the CONDENSED width character modes with 
the NORMAL width character mode printer- command (5.i5). The 
default -for this function is NORMAL width characters. 

Note: if you wish to mix EXPANDED width characters and NORMAL 
width characters on the same line is it would be better- to use 
the EXPANDED CHARACTER function described in section 4.43. 



Example: 



("..." means possible other commands) 



<...,W,...<- 

John Do©<- 
<...,N,...+- 

is my name.*- 

This will be printed: 

John C- o e 
i s my n ame . 



PRINTER COMMANDS 



Page 57 



5.14. CONDENSED WIDTH CHARACTERS 



Q 



Use this printer command ii you want your text to be 
printed in CONDENSED WIDTH CHARACTER mode, provided your printer 
has this capability. H your printer is type K2t K3, K4, K5, 
K6, K?» K8, K9, K19, or K28 (5.1), you can also print in what is 
known as CONDENSED-EXPANDED character mode. To achieve this 
type style just use this printer command along with the EXPANDED 
width character printer command (5.13). Terminate both the 
CONDENSED and the EXPANDED width character modes with the NORMAL 
width character mode printer- command (5.15). The default for 
this -function is NORMAL width characters. 



Example: 



("..." means possible other commands) 



(*■■ |Uj ■ ■ i^ 1 

My name is<- 
<. . . ,N, . . .«- 

John Doe«*- 

This will be printed: 

My na»e is 
John Doe. 



Page 58 



ZORLDF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.15. NORMAL WIDTH CHARACTERS N 



This printer command is used to cancel the EXPANDED and/or 
CONDENSED width character modes (5.13, 5.14). The default ■for 
this function is NORMAL width character mode. 



Example: (see 5.13 or 5.14) 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 5? 



5.16. CHARACTER DENSITY Dn 



propo 

o+ de 



This printer command is only needed if you are printing in 
rtional-space mode. This command gives you the capability 
_iciding how tightly packed you want a line of characters to 
be printed. The M n" in the expression is the CHARACTER DENSITY, 
in characters per inch, and can be any value from 6.8 to 20.0, 
in increments of .1 characters per inch. 

From this density figure you can determine the actual 
length of the line in inches knowing the length of the line in 
characters. Say you have specified your text lines to be 64 
characters long, max <3.2), and you want that to print out to 
exactly 5 inches. Using a little simple math you would 
determine that this translates to a CHARACTER DENSITY of 12.8 
characters per inch. The default for this function is 13.0 
characters per inch for printer types K3> K?» K8» and K?; and 
10.0 characters per inch for printer types Kii. K13, K14, K16, 
K20 (5.1). These are, by the way, just about as tightly as you 
normally can pack a line on each of the given printers and still 
have some noticeable amount of space between the words. This 
manual was printed with a CHARACTER DENSITY of 11.0 characters 
per- inch. 

Note: As long as you are printing in NORMAL or- CONDENSED WIDTH 
CHARACTER mode, the density you specify will be the actual 
density printed. EXPANDED WIDTH characters will be printed at 
half the density you specify. 

Caution: If character- densities ar-e specified which exceed 10.5 
on daisy wheel printers or 14.0 on dot matrix printers, you may 
see one or more lines in which the characters did not Justify 
properly. If this should ever happen it will be necessary to 
specify a lower value for- the character density. 

Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . ,D13.8, . . .*- 

Jack and Jill ran up a hi 11.+- 

< . . . , D6 . 5 , . . . «- 

Jack and Jill ran up a hi 11.+- 

This will be printed: 

Jack and Jill ran up a hill. 

Jack and Jill ran up a hill. 



Page 60 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5. 17. BOLDINQ TEXT Bxxxx... 



Using this command* you can specify which characters in 
the -following text line you want to be bolded. If that string 
of characters is found in the following text line» those 
characters will be over-printed 7 times to cause them to appear 
darker than the other characters which are only printed once. 
The "xxxx..." in this expression is that string of characters 
and can be as long or as short as you wishi provided all the 
characters of the string fit on the same printer command line. 
Up to 2 BOLD printer command strings can be specified per text 
line . 

If your printer is a type K4, K5 f Dr K26 (5.i)» you are 
better off in this regard. These printers have a DOUBLE 
PRINT — EMPHASIZE mode which can be used to achieve bold 
printing. If you have specified the K4, K5 f or K28 printer type 
in a previous printer command) ZORLOF will automatically take 
advantage of these printers' special abilities so your BOLD can 
be achieved by only 1 pass over the text line instead of 8» as 
required on the other types of printers. 

Note: If the BOLDED text is also specified to be UNDERLINED 
<4.4&, 5.18), the UNDERLINE will also be BOLDED. 

Note: For proper registration of the overprinted text during 
BOLDING> it is recomanded that the fiction feed mechanism be 
engaged at all times, even on tractor feed printers. 

Caution: No other printer command should follow the BOLD 
printer command on the same line* since commas (,) in this 
printer command are considered to be part of the text that will 
be BOLDED) and not as the delimiters between commands as they 
usually are. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . ,Bnot<~ 

< . . . jB'humi d+- 

The unit will not operate in humid condi t i ons.«- 

This will be printed: 

The unit will not operate in humid conditions. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 6i 



5.18. UNDERLINING TEXT Uxxxx... 



Using this command, you can specify which characters in 
the •following text line you want to be UNDERLINED. If that 
string of characters is found in the following text line those 
characters will be printed with an UNDERLINE. The "xxxx..." in 
this expression is that string of characters and can be as long 
or as short as you wish* provided all the characters of the 
string fit on the same printer command line. Up to 2 UNDERLINE 
printer command strings can be specified per text line. 

If your printer- is a type K2, K3» K5, K6, K?» K8, K9, K10, 
Kli, K14, Ki8f ar K20 (5.1), you are better off in this regard. 
These printers have the capability of printing the underline at 
the same time as the text. As long as you made the right 
PRINTER TYPE specification (5,1), ZORLOF will take advantage of 
■this feature and give you UNDERLINING with only i pass over the 
text line instead of 2, as required on the other types of 
printers. 

Note: H the UNDERLINED text is also specified to be BOLDED 
(5.17), the UNDERLINE will also be BOLDED. 

Caution: No other printer command should follow the UNDERLINE 
printer command on the same line, since commas (,) in this 
printer command are considered to be part of the text that will 
be underlined, and not as the delimiters between commands as 
they usually are. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<... ,Unot<- 

< . . , , Uhumi d<- 

The unit will not operate in humid condi tions.«- 

This will be printed: 

The unit will not operate in humi d conditions. 



(See sections 4.40, 4.57, and 5.27 for alternate methods of 
achieving underlined text.) 



Page 62 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.19. ITALIC TEXT Vxxxx... 



Using this command, you can specify which characters in 
the following text line you want to be printed in ITALICS. The 
"xxxx..." in this expression is that string of characters and 
can be as long or- as short as you wish, provided all the 
characters of the string fit on the same printer command line. 
Up to 2 ITALIC printer command strings can be specified per text 
line . 

Of the printers that ZORLOF supports, the Epson MX -80 and 
MX-ie& with Graftrax or Graftrax Plus (K5 or K20, see 5.1) are 
the only printers that have the capability of directly printing 
text in ITALICS. ITALIC printing can also be accomplished on 
any printer that has the capability of high resolution dot 
graphics (K2, K3, K6, K7, K8, and K9>, through the use of the 
SPECIAL CHARACTER function described in section 5.27. Although 
it is a bit more work, the results can be quite impressive. The 
example below was printed using this method. 

Caution: No other printer command should follow the ITALIC 
printer command on the same line, since commas (,) in this 
printer command are considered to be part of the text that will 
be printed in ITALICS, and not as the delimiters between 
commands as they usually are. 



Example: (",.." means possible other commands) 

< . . . ,Vnot«- 

< . . . ,Vhumi d<- 

The unit will not operate in humid condi t i ons.<- 

This will be printed: 

The unit will not- operate in harmld conditions. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 63 



5.2 9. SUPER/SUBSCRIPTING TEXT Sxxxx... 



This command is used in conjunction with the SUPERSCRIPT 
character- (+H4.54) and SUBSCRIPT character- <*>(4.55) to achieve 
SUPERSCRIPTS and SUBSCRIPTS in your- printed text. In this 
expression the "xxxx..." is a string of characters that defines 
which characters are to be SUPERSCRIPTED and SUBSCRIPTED. You 
can use one printer command to define all the SUPER/SUBSCRIPTS 
in the entire text if you wish, or you can use several shorter 
ones as they are needed throughout the text. In either case, 
there must be one character defined by this command for every 
SUPERSCRIPT character (*> or SUBSCRIPT character <+> that 
appears in the text — no more and no less. 

Note: It is not possible to have SUPER/SUBSCRIPTED text BQLDED, 
or in ITALICS, unless done through the use of the SPECIAL 
FUNCTION printer command (5.27). 

Note: For proper registration of the SUPERSCRIPTED and 
SUBSCRIPTED characters, it is recomended that the friction feed 
mechanism be engaged at all times, even on a tractor feed 
printer. 

Caution: This function will only work on K2, K3, K5, K6, K7, 
K8, K?, Kie, Kli, K12, Ki3, K14, K15, K16, and K26 printer types 
(5.1 ). 



Example: ("..." means possible other- commands) 

<.. . ,S123<x+i) ,...<- 

X-t+X4.+X4-=Yttttf<- 

This will be printed: 

X 1 +X 2 +X 3 =Y (X+1) 



Pa?e 64 ZDRLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.21. SUPPRESS LINE-FEED XL 



Use this printer command if you ever want to over-print 
one line with another line. This command only affects the text 
line that immediately follows it and none other. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<. . . ,XL,.. .*■ 

The current is not to exceed 6.300 amps.*- 

«IIIIIiII»«III|ft //«- 

This will be printed: 

The current is not to exceed 6.3J0J0 amps. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 65 



5.22. SUPPRESS CARRIAGE-RETURN XC 



Use this printer command to join 2 or mare display lines 

to achieve an extra-long printed line. This command only 

affects the text line that immediately follows it and none 
other. 

Note: The LINE-PEED for the first line and the TEXT LEFT MARGIN 
for the second line are also suppressed automatically at the 
time this command is executed. 

Caution: No portion of the second (or higher) adjoining line 
segments can contain any BOLDED, or ITALIC character unless 
done through the use of the SPECIAL FUNCTION printer command 
(5.2?) . 



Example: (»,.." means possible other commands) 

Service is our middle name, qual i 
ty our first. *- 

This will be printed: 

Service is our middle name, quality our -first. 



Page 66 ZOHLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.23. TURN PRINTING OFF AND ON OFF.DN 



Use "these two printer commands in cases when you have a 
very large text -file» but you want only certain parts of it to 
be printed. These commands can be used to delimit comment 
statements throughout your text* as well. 

All printer commands that fall between the n QFF M and "ON" 
commands, except for- PRINTER CONTROL CODES (5.26), will be 
processed, even though the text is treated as if it wasn't 
there. 

Note: Using the "ON" and "OFF" printer commands will not cause 
gaps in text while the text is being PRINTED on the page or 
VIEWED on the screen. The delimited text is treated like it 

wasn't even there. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . ,OFF, . . .*- 

Since the meeting on Tuesday, orders have 

been on a steady increase. +■ 

<. . . ,ON,. . .<- 

In this example the sentence between the "OFF" and the "ON" 
commands is treated, as far as the PRINT TEXT and the VIEW TEXT 
functions are concerned, as if it was not in the text. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 6? 



5.24. GO TO LINE NUMBER Qn 



Upon receipt of this command ZORLOF will hold off sending 
any text to the printer-. Instead* line feeds will be sent to 
the printer until the print head peaches the line number on the 
page specified by the "n M in this command. At which time the 
printing of the text resumes. This command is very useful for 
leaving a large blank area on the paper without putting a lot of 
RETURN characters in your text. If the print head passes a 
HEADER (5.26), FOOTER (5,29), or PAGE NUMBER LINE (5.3») on the 
way to its "Go To" destination, it (they) will be printed. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . ,G 1 , . . . *- 

In this example the text will resume printing at the top of the 
text body on the next page. HEADER, FOOTER, and PAGE NUMBER 
LINES will be printed. 



Page 68 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.25. GO RELATIVE GRn 



This printer command is very similar to the GO LINE NUMBER 

command (5.24) except that it allows you to specify a desired 

number of blank lines without knowing what line number- you are 
currently on. 



Example'- ("..." means possible other- commands) 

Peace on Earth, «- 

< . . . »GR3, . . .*■ 

And good will toward men.<- 

This will be printed - - 

Peace on Earth, 



And good will toward men. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 69 



5.26. PRINTER CONTROL CODES Caabb...Xn,CLaabb.,.Xn 



Most printers can do more than just print characters. 
Some can roll the paper- backwards* set vertical tabs* change 

type styles, etc. These are all controlled and communicated to 
the printer- by what is known as PRINTER CONTROL CODES (ASCII 
values less than 20H). If you look in the operator's manual 
that came with your printer you will •find a list of these 
special capabilities and the PRINTER CONTROL CODES used to make 
them work. 

If you own one of the printers listed in section 5.1 and 
have used the proper PRINTER TYPE specification, you can have 
access to most of these special capabilities through the use of 
the appropriate printer commands. However, if you have a 
different model printer, or just want to have direct control of 
your printer's special abilities, ZORLOF gives you the freedom 
to do so using this printer command. All of the special type 
fonts of the Epson printers can be achieved using this function 
(see second example). 

The H aabb... n in this expression is a set of one or more 
(not more than a line full) two-digit hexidecimal numbers (with 
no separation). The "Xn" combination in this expression is 
optional and only needed if you wish the string of PRINTER 
CONTROL CODES to be sent to the printer a repeated number of 
times. The "n" is any decimal value from 2 to 65535. The "L" 
in the second expression indicates that this string of CONTROL 
CODES should be sent to the printer "n" number of times at the 
start of every line. Each "CL..." printer command in the text 
will cancel any preceding "CL..." commands. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<. . . ,C9AX20 ,...*- 
This command will send 29 line feeds («AH> to the printer. 

<. . . ,CL1B45,...«- 

On an Epson printer, this command will cause all of the 
following text to be printed in the "Emphasized" type font. 



Page ?e ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.27. SPECIAL FUNCTION CHARACTER £(n)'xaa'y'zbb... 



The SPECIAL FUNCTION CHARACTER printer- command is in many 
ways similar to the Printer CONTROL CODE printer command 
(5.26). However, it goes one step -further, in that it allows 
you to send to the printer a string of ASCII characters and 
printer control codes mid-line . One SPECIAL FUNCTION character- 
is used- in the line o-f text to "locate" the string (4.17)» while 
a previous SPECIAL FUNCTION printer command "defines" that 
character. 

The "n" in the expression is an optional width value for 
the character thus defined, and is only necessary if printing in 
proportional-space mode with text justified to the right and 
left margins. This tells ZORLOF how much room, in 
proportional-space pixel widths, this special character is going 
to require. Any value for "n" from 8 to 254 is allowed. If the 
"Cn>" is used, it must follow right after the SPECIAL FUNCTION 
character (£) within the printer command line. If the "(n)" is 
omitted from the expression, then the normal proportional-space 
width of the first ASCII character found in the string is 
assumed. If there are no ASCII characters in the string, a 
width of is assumed. The widths of measure for "n" (dot 
widths) on the various printer types are: 

1/168 inches K7, K8, K9 

1/159 inches K3 

1/120 inches K13, K14, K16, K20 

1/60 inches Kll 

The '"x", "'y"» and '"z" in the expression are the ASCII 
characters. Any single character preceded by an apostrophe (') 
is considered in this command to be an ASCII character. The 
"aa" and "bb" in the expression are two-digit hexidecimal 
numbers. These will most often be printer control codes which 
cannot be expressed as ASCII characters. However, even ASCII 
characters can be expressed as two-digit hexidecimal numbers if 
you choose. These can be located in any order and in any amount 
throughout the expression. 

This is the only printer command that can be more than one 
display line long. See the last example in this section. 
Follow these rules for SPECIAL FUNCTION printer commands that 
have to be longer than one display line: 

i. Each SPECIAL FUNCTION printer command line should start 
with the PRINTER COMMAND character «), but only the first 
line should contain the SPECIAL FUNCTION character (£). 

2. Only the last line of the printer command should be 
terminated by a RETURN character «-) or a comma (,). 

3. Do not break the line in a place that would split a pair 
of characters which represents an ASCII character Cx) or 
a printer control code (aa). 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 71 



The following are some examples of how the SPECIAL 
FUNCTION character can be used. Keep in mind that each one of 
these examples was printed using a NEC PC-8623A-C printer. H 
you have a different type of printer, the concept will be the 
same, but the implementation will have to conform to your own 
printer's specifications. Study your printer manual to learn 
the printer control code representations of graphic characters, 
extended symbols, foreign language characters, control of type 
style enhancements, fonts, and the control of print head and 
carriage movements. Once learned, you could be using the 
SPECIAL FUNCTION command to create countless symbols, shapes, 
borders, pictures -- you name it. 



i. Access to foreign characters: 
<&IB26' J1B24+- 

The circumference o-f a circle is 2£. «- 
printed: 

The circumference of a circle is 2K. 



2. Access to symbols: 

<£1B23'I 1B24,£1B23'H1B24«- 
A bid of 3£ cannot follow a bid of 3&.+- 
printed: 

A bid of 3* cannot follow a bid of 3*. 



3. Access to print enhancements. 

<£lB58'"u,£'eiB5?<- 

This is another way to £nderlin£ a word.*- 
printed*. 

This is another way to under 1 i ne a word. 



4. Access to dot graphics (justified in proportional-space). 

<£<25> IB' S'0'0' 2' 54880 2460 12000980 1200 240 0488624 
<80 12000900 1208240848*- 

<£(27> 1 B' S' 8'0' 2' 71C00 I486 1488 1400 1408 1408 1408 14 
C8022004 1004 1084 1062200 1C<- 

While on vacation in Africa I discovered a 
small piece of pottery with two strange marks on 
it. One was a wavy set of lines £, and the 
other was a circle with a kind of handle t. I 
have been looking for for a year for someone who 
can tell me its meaning. «- 



printed: 



While on vacation in Africa I discovered a 
small piece of pottery with two strange marks on 
it. One was a wavy set of lines ^, and the 
other was a circle with a kind of handle "=0. I 
have been looking for- for a year for someone who 
can tell me its meaning. 



Page 72 20RL0F OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.28. HEADER LINE SET Hn 



This command sets the vertical positioning of the user- 
formattable HEADER LINES. This is usually specified to fall 
somewhere between the top of the page and the top of the text 
bodyt but could also be specified to fall below the text body, 
if desired. However*! it should never be specified to fall 
within the text body (5 .7 , 5.8)» or on the same line as the 
FOOTER (5.29) or PAGE NUMBER LINE (5.3«), or- it may not get 
printed. The function can be deactivated altogether by using 
the command: M H«". The default for this command is "He". 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

In this example the HEADER LINES will be printed on the third 
line of the paper, or about a half an inch below the top of the 
page* assuming 6 lines per inch spacing (standard). 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 73 



5,2'?. FOOTER LIKE SET Fn 



This printer command is just like the HEADER LINE SET 
command (5.28) except that it sets the vertical positioning of 
the user formattable FOOTER LINES. This is usually specified to 
■fall somewhere between the end of the text body and the bottom 
of the page ( but could also be specified to fall above the text 
body to achieve a double HEADER LINE, if desired. However, it 
should never be specified to fall within the text body (5.7t 
5.3), or on the same line as the HEADER (5.28) or PAGE NUMBER 
LINE (5.30)| or it may not get printed. The function can be 
deactivated altogether by using the command: "FO". The default 
for this command is "F6". 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<.. . . , F63, . . .*• 

In this example the FOOTER LINES will be printed on the 63rd 

line of the paper* or about a half an inch from the bottom of 

the page, assuming 11 inch long paper and 6 lines per inch 
spacing (standard). 



Page 74 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.38. PAGE NUMBER LINE SET Pn 



This printer command is Just like the HEADER LINE BET 
command (5.28) except that it sets the vertical positioning of 
the user formattable PAGE NUMBER LINES. This is usually 
specified to fall somewhere between the end of the text body and 
the bottom of the page, but could also be specified to fall 
above the text body, if desired. However, it should never be 
specified to fall within the text body (5.?, 5.8), or on the 
same line as the HEADER (5.28) or FOOTER LINES (5.29), or it may 
not get printed. The function can be deactivated altogether by 
using the command: "P&". The default for this command is "PG". 



Example: (",.," means possible other- commands) 

< . . . ,P4, . . .*- 

In this example the PAGE NUMBER LINES will be printed on the 4th 
line of the paper, or about a half an inch from the top of the 
page, assuming 6 lines per inch spacing (standard). 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 75 



5.3 i, HEADER LINE FORMAT HOJx,HEJx 



ZDRLOF allows you to define 2 different HEADERS — one for 
the odd-numbered pages and one for- the even-numbered pages. 
The full command consists of either "HO" or- "HE" to specify 
which HEADER is being defined (odd or even), followed by "JL M » 
"JR"» "JB", or U JC" to specify how the line will be justified 
(5.11), and followed finally by a RETURN character (<->. The 
"Jx" part of the expression is optional; if not used, "JR" is 
the default for odd-numbered pages, and H JL" for even-numbered 
pages. 

On the line immediately following this command you must 
type the HEADER LINE just as you would like to see it printed on 
the paper. Define the HEADER LINE for the alternately numbered 
pages in the same way. It is necessary to define both headers 
if they are going to be used at all, even if they are exactly 
the same. If you do not wish to implement HEADER LINES you can 
deactivate this function by setting HEADER LINE SET command to 
"H0" (5.28). 

Note: it is possible to have UNDERLINED (4.40) and EXPANDED 
(4.43) characters in the HEADER LINE, but not BQLDED, CONDENSED, 
or ITALIC characters. 

Caution: The HEADER LINE DEFINE FORMAT line must be followed by 
a RETURN character K-), even if it must be placed on the 
following line. If the RETURN character is accidentally 
omitted, the text from the HEADER LINE definition to the next 
occurrence of a RETURN character in your text will not be 
printed . 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<... ,HOJO 

STioipii !c!a8 1!S»:Rie!v!i!e!w<- 

<. ..,HEJC<- 

A Space In Time<- 

In this example the HEADER LINE on the Ddd-numbered pages will 
be printed: 

Topi cal R ev i & w 

For the even numbered pages: 

A Space In Time 



Page 76 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.32, FOOTER LINE FORMAT FOJx»FEJx 



The explanation for this command is the same as -for the 
HEADER LINE FORMAT printer command (5.31). 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 77 



5.33. PAGE NUMBER LINE FORMAT POJx,PEJx 



The explanation -for this command is the same as -for the 

HEADER LINE FORMAT printer command (5.3i)» except that you can 
put* somewhere in the line definition a string of one or more 
NUMBER SYMBOL characters («) which will be replaced by the 
current line number when the line is printed. Use enough NUMBER 
SYMBOL characters for the amount of digits of your highest page 
number. 



Example; ("..." means possible other commands) 

<... . ,POJB<- 

Roses In Springtime iliiliiii Page tttt* 

<. . . ,PEJ8*- 

Page ### liliiHIll Roses In Springtime 

«- 

The PAGE NUMBER LINE for page i will be printed: 

Roses In Springtime Page 1 

The PAGE NUMBER LINE for page 248 will be printed: 

Page 248 Roses In Springtime 



Page 78 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.34. HEADER LINE LEFT MARGIN HMDn,HMEn 



This command is just like the TEXT LEFT MARGIN printer 
command (5,9), and all the same rules* explanations* defaults* 
and examples apply. The only difference is that this command 
specifies the left side margin for the HEADER LINES instead of 
the TEXT LINES. 



5.35. FOOTER LINE LEFT MARGIN FM0n t FMEn 



This command is just like the TEXT LEFT MARGIN printer 
command (5.9), and all the same rules* explanations* defaults* 
and examples apply. The only difference is that this command 
specifies the left side margin for the FOOTER LINES instead of 
the TEXT LINES. 



5.3d. PAGE NUMBER LINE LEFT MARGIN PMOn.PMEn 



This command is just like the TEXT LEFT MARGIN printer 
command (5.9), and all the same rules, explanations* defaults* 
and examples apply. The only difference is that this command 
specifies the left side margin for the PAGE NUMBER LINES instead 
of the TEXT LINES. 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page ?? 



5.37. PAGE NUMBER SET Pttn 



This printer command sets the starting page number. It 
can be changed at any place in the text if desired. The default 
for the function is "P#i". 



Example: ("..." means possihle other commands! 

<. . . ,Pttiee, . . .«- 

All pages printed after this command will be numbered counting 
from 186. 



Caution: It is usually best to position the PAGE NUMBER SET 
command at a point in the text where it will be processed 
between the printing of the last line of one page and the first 
line of the next page. The only way to insure this is to put 
the PAGE NUMBER SET command in a printer command line ahead of 
the first text line to set the page number initially, and on the 
very next line following a GO TO LINE NUMBER command <Gn, see 
5.24) where "n" in the expression is the number of lines per 
page that you set by the PAGE LENGTH SET command (5.6). Do not 
put both on the same printer command line or it will not work 
correctly . 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

<.. . . f G66, . . .<- 
<... ,P#281, . . .<- 

The "G66" command will cause the current page to finish 
printingi assumimg the page length was set at 66 linesi and the 
following page will start numbering at 281. 



Page 80 ZQRLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



5.38. FORM LETTER DATA FILE SPECIFICATION DA TA F I LE= filename 

Use this printer command at the very top of a FORM LETTER 
TEXT FILE to tell ZORLOF the file name of the FORM LETTER DATA 
FILE containing the data records that will be used as input to 
the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE at the time of the form letter 
printing run. See section 7 for a complete explanation of how 
to create and run FORM LETTER TEXT FILES and FORM LETTER DATA 
FILES. 

The "DATAFILE=" in this expression is the constant, but 
can, however, be shortened to "DA=" if you wish. The "filename" 
in this expression is the real name that you have given to the 

FORM LETTER DATA FILE to be used with this FORM LETTER TEXT 
FILE. 

If this printer command is present, then, at the time of 
the PRINTING (4.35) or VIEWING (4.41) of the FORM LETTER TEXT 
FILE, ZORLOF will load the FORM LETTER DATA FILE into memory one 
data record at a time, replace the data labels within the FORM 
LETTER TEXT FILE with the data fields associated with those 
labels from each data record of the FORM LETTER DATA FILE. Once 
all the replacing is finished for the first data record, the 
text is printed, and the process is repeated, giving one printed 
letter (document, lease, whatever) for each data record of the 
FORM LETTER DATA FILE. If this printer command is not present, 
ZORLOF assumes that the text file is not a FORM LETTER TEXT 
FILE, and at the time of PRINTING or VIEWING will print out the 
text file only once and without any replacement of the data 
labels. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . , DATAFI LE=FORM/DAT ,...*■ 

This printer- command tells ZORLOF that the text file in memory 
is a FORM LETTER TEXT FILE, containing data labels that will be 

replaced by data fields, which are contained in data records, 
which are found on the disk, under the file name of "FDRM/DAT". 



PRINTER COMMANDS Page 81 



5.39. FORM LETTER DATA ID QUALIFIER PRINT=abcde... 



This is an optional printer command used within a FORM 
LETTER TEXT FILE to specify which data records from the FORM 
LETTER DATA FILE will be used as data inputs during the form 
letter printing run. Only those data records that have ID's 
matching one of those specified in this printer command, and 
data records which have no ID's at all, will be printed. If 
this command is omitted from the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE, there 
will be one copy of the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE printed for every 
data record of the FORM LETTER DATA FILE, regardless of the 
records' ID character. 

The "PRINT*" is the constant in this expression, but can 
be shortened to "FR=" if you wish. The "abcde..." is a list of 
one character data record ID's (no separation) Which are to 
match the one character ID's of the data records contained 
within the FORM LETTER DATA FILE, that you want to be used as 
input to the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE at the time of the run. The 
data record ID can be any character except the SPACE ( ) and the 
RETURN character «-). If used, this command must be positioned 
in the FORM LETTER DATA FILE ahead of any printed text. See 
section 7 for a complete explanation of how to create and run 
FORM LETTER TEXT FILES and FORM LETTER DATA FILES. 



Example: ("..." means possible other commands) 

< . . . , DATAF I LE=FORM/DAT , PRINT=XQT ,...<- 

This printer command tells ZORLOF that the text file in memory 
is a FORM LETTER TEXT FILE, containing data labels that will be 
replaced by data fields, which are contained in data records, 
which are found on the disk, under the file name of "FORM/DAT". 
But , only those records that have an ID of X, .Q, T, or no ID at 
all will be used. The other data records contained within 
FORM/DAT will be skipped. 



Page 82 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



6. EDITING BASIC AND EDTASM FILES 



Almost every capability available to you while editing 
normal text files can also be used when editing BASIC and EDTASM 
files. A few things work, a little differently due to the unique 
nature of these types of files. And then there are an 
additional couple of capabilities ZQRLQF reserves just for these 
two file types. We are sure that as you become familiar with 
these few special provisions you will soon be using the same 
high-speed, labor-saving powers of ZORLOF to edit your program 
source files as you have for your text files. 



EDITING BASIC AND EDTASM FILES Page S3 



6.1. WIDTH FIELD 



The contents of the WIDTH FIELD (3.2 and Appendix A) will 
determine whether ZORLOF treats your text as normal text or as a 
BASIC or- EDTASM file. If the WIDTH FIELD contains "BAS", the 
text is treated as a BASIC file. If the WIDTH FIELD contains 
"EDA", the text is treated as an Apparat EDTASM file. If the 
WIDTH FIELD contains "EDR", the text is treated as a Radio Shack. 
EDTASM file. 



6.2. INSERT PROGRAM LINE 



When the OPEN LINE function (CLEAR-0, see 4.34) is 
implemented while editing a BASIC or EDTASM file, a special 
thing happens: ZORLOF goes into the INSERT PROGRAM LINE mode. 
All the text below the cursor moves down one line, a new line 
number is automatically written at the start of the new blank 
line (one greater than the value of the previous line number), 
and the cursor is moved to the second space after the line 
number. While in this mode, each time a line is ended by a 
RETURN character (*-) (striking the ENTER key, 4.47) another blank 
line with a new line number appears on the screen. 

This function will terminate automatically when the line 

number of the current line is one less than the line number of 

the following line, or manually by moving the cursor to the 

start of the line and hitting CLEAR-L (4.31). 



Page 84 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



6.3. RENUMBERING 



Upon hitting CLEAR-3 the BASIC or- EDTASM -file is removed 
from the screen* all the program lines are renumbered starting 
at 18 and counting by 10, and the text returns to the screen. 
This function is also covered in section 4.56. 



6.4. TABBING 



TABBING with EDTASM files is much the same as it is with 
normal text files (4.3ft) except that SPACES ( ) are used instead 
of TAB characters (-»>. Since none of the lines in an EDTASM 
file will ever be justified, there was no need to use a special 
character other than a space to separate the words on each side 
of the TAB as there was with text files. 

If you TAB while the cursor is over a line number, the 
line number will be preserved and the cursor will just move to 
the second space after the line number. At any other place in 
the line the TAB will write over the text (unless the INSERT 
function is on* see 4.27). 

TABBING is not allowed on BASIC text files. No action 
will be taken if you try to implement the function when the 

WIDTH FIELD contains "BAS". 



EDITING BASIC AND EDTASM FILES Page 85 



6.5. LINE LENGTHS 



You are free to allow EDTASM and BASIC program lines -to be 
as long as you want them to be, even exceeding one or more 
64-character display lines. Some Basic interpreter-si however* 
put an upper limit on the length of a program line that it can 
process. This is sometimes in the neighborhood of 240 
characters. If this is true about the BASIC interpreter you are 
using, then please keep it in mind. 

During text manipulation of EDTASM and BASIC -files, ZORLDF 
will always assume everything from one RETURN character («-> thru 
the next RETURN character to be one program lire. While 
INSERTING <4.27), all characters -from the cursor thru the next 
RETRUN character will get shifted to the right. When DELETING 
<4.ii>, all characters -from the cursor thru the next RETURN 
character will get shifted to the left. 



6.6. PRINTER COMMANDS 



Don't use PRINTER COMMANDS with BASIC or EDTASM files, 
simply because other programs, such as compilers and assemblers, 
that read these files, will not allow PRINTER COMMANDS. When 
you do print the file, ZORLQF's printer command defaults will 
take over and give you page lengths of 66 lines, 6 lines of 
spacing at the top, 4 lines of spacing at the bottom, and 8 
characters of spacing at the left. 



Page 86 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



?. PROCESSING FORM LETTERS 



A FORM LETTER, as it is spoken of here, is any text of 

which several copies have to be printed. Each copy will be the 

same as all the other copies o-f the run except •for a couple of 

words or phrases here and there. The "variables" in the text 

might be such things as persons' names, addresses, occupations, 

etc. This happens most fequently with -form letters, but applies 

just as well to legal documents, rental leases, invitations, 
mailing lables, and the like. 

ZORLQF has the capability of processing form letters thru 

the implementation of two special file types: the FORM LETTER 
TEXT FILE and the FORM LETTER DATA FILE. These two files are 
described on the following pages. 

To quicken your understanding of how ZORLQF processes form 
letters, we have included on the 2ORL0F master disk a sample 
FORM LETTER TEXT FILE called "FORM/TXT" and a FORM LETTER DATA 
FILE called "FORM/DAT" to be run with it. We recommend that you 
look them both aver, examine the format of each, and then run it 
for yourself on your own system. This can be done simply by 
loading "FORM/TXT" into memory using CLEAR-G (4.25), then hit 
CLEAR-P to start it. You may notice that the data file contains 
three data records but only two of them were used. Of the two 
that were used one had an ID that matched one of the characters 
in the FORM LETTER DATA ID QUALIFIER printer command <5.39), and 
the other one had no ID at all. Take out the FORM LETTER DATA 
ID QUALIFIER printer command in the text file and run it again. 
This time all three data r-ecor-ds will be used. 



PROCESSING FORM LETTERS Page 87 



7.1. FORM LETTER TEXT FILE 



There is only a -few things about this type of text file 
that are different -from your everyday ZORLOF text -file. The 
main difference is that a FORM LETTER TEXT FILE will contain the 
FORM LETTER DATA FILE SPECIFICATION printer command (5.38). 
This command tells ZORLOF two things: that this is a FORM 
LETTER TEXT FILE, and what the name of the FORM LETTER DATA FILE 
is that will be used with it. The second difference is that the 
FORM LETTER TEXT FILE may (it's optional) contain the FORM 
LETTER DATA ID QUALIFIER printer command (5.39), if only a 
portion of the FORM LETTER DATA FILE is to be used. The last 
difference is that the "variable" parts of the text will have 
"labels". These "labels" wiil be replaced by data from the FORM 
LETTER DATA FILE during the form letter run. 



Page 88 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



7.2. FORM LETTER DATA FILE 



The FORM LETTER DATA FILE is the file thai contains the 
list of names, addresses, phone numbers, etc, that will replace 
the variable labels in the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE. The FORM 
LETTER DATA FILE is broken into sub-units which we call data 
records. When the form letter is run, one copy of the FORM 
LETTER TEXT FILE will be printed for each data record of the 
FORM LETTER DATA FILE. Therefore, one data record will contain 
all the necessary data for one person (client, account, 
whatever). You may, however, choose only a select grouping of 
data records to be used during the form letter run, if you 
desire, by giving each data record an ID and then specifying 
which data records will be used by the FORM LETTER DATA ID 
QUALIFIER printer command (5.39). There is no limit to the 
number of data records you are allowed per FORM LETTER DATA 
FILE. 

Each data record is also made up of sub-units, which we 
call data fields. The data field is one unit of information 
about the person (client, account, whatever). There could be 
one data field for his name, one for his phone number, one for 
his shoe size, etc. There is no limit as to the number- of data 
fields you are allowed per data record. ZORLOF also allows data 
records to be any size from as small as 1 character to as large 
as 1088 characters. Thus, one "variable" of the form letter 
could be a whole paragraph or- a long list of items, if you want 
it to be that long. 

Each data field, in turn, is made up of two smaller units: 
the data field label and the actual data associated with that 
label. The label can be any string of characters (except space, 
RETURN character, and comma) as short as one character or as 
long as 28 characters. These labels should match exactly the 
variable labels found throughout the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE. 
During the time of the form letter run, all strings of 
characters in the FORM LETTER TEXT FILE that match data labels 
in a given data record of the FORM LETTER DATA FILE will be 
replaced by the data from the data field associated with that 
label. Once all the replacing is done for one data record, the 
modified text file is printed out. 



PROCESSING FORM LETTERS Page 89 



7.3. CHEATING A FORM LETTER DATA FILE 



Creating a FORM LETTER DATA FILE is as easy as falling off 
a log. First, decide whether you are going to type cast the 
data records allowing yourself the oppertunity to specify only 
records of certain types be used during the form letter run 
(5.39). If so, type one character (any character but space, 
RETURN character, or comma) for that data record's ID and hit 
the ENTER key. Do this at the start of every data record in the 
FORM LETTER DATA FILE* using a different character to indicate a 
different record type. If, on the other hand, you have no need 
to segregate the data records into group types then skip this 
step. 

The next step is even easier. Type a one word label 1 to 
28 characters long to match one of the variable labels in the 
FORM LETTER TEXT FILE (you make it up), type a space or- a RETURN 
character (*-), type one unit of data 1 to 108& characters long 
(the guy's name or- whatever), then type a RETURN character («-). 
The only ground rules on the data part is that it be less than 
i © © 1 characters long and contain one, and only one, RETURN 
character, and thats to be at the end of the data field. Repeat 
this for each data field of the data record. 

The last step is the easiest of all. Just type one more 
RETURN character- (^) after the RETURN character of the last data 
field of the data record. When ZORLOF sees these two RETURN 
characters in a row it will know that the data record is ended. 
Continue these steps, creating one data record for each copy of 
the form letter to be printed. 

The next two pages contain one FORM LETTER TEXT FILE 
example and one FORM LETTER TEXT FILE example. These are the 
same two form letter files supplied on your ZORLOF master disk. 
You will notice that the data file contains three data records 
each having eight. The first and third data record have ID'St 
but the second has none. Also notice that the data field lables 
in the data file match the variable labels in the text file. 



Page ?0 ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



7.4. FORM LETTER TEXT FILE EXAMPLE FORM/TXT 



< j r , dataf il e =FORM/DAT , pr i n t=a#*qXY?*- 

DOWNTOWN FEDERAL TRUST*- 
106 Penny Lane*- 
Fort Knox, Kentucky 45882*- 
<jbt- 
*- 
*- 
*- 

field2 fieldS*- 

f ield4<- 

f iel d5,-f iel d6 Dec ember- 12,- 1982 



*- 

*- 

*- 

«- 

Dear fieldl -fields, <- 

«- 

«- 

-»-*-*-*-*-»We represent a company that is in the business of loaning 

money to qualified individuals.— It has came to our attention 

that you are in the market for a new field? but need fields to 

pay for it.— We would like to lend you that fields.— Just -fill 

out the enclosed application form and send it in today.— If you 

qualify you could be enjoying that new field? in less than one 

month from today.— Just think of it, fieldl fields, you could be 

the pride of field5 with that new field?.— Just send in the 

aplication, we do the rest.— You will be notified of your 

acceptance by certified mail.*~ 

*- 

<- 

*- 

«- 

*r 
*- 

< i 1 24«- 

Sincerel y ,*- 

*- 

*- 

C. W. Moneybags*- 

Presedent, Downtown Federal Trust*- 



PROCESSING FORM LETTERS Page 91 



7.5. FORM LETTER DATA FILE EXAMPLE FORM/DAT 



•fieldl Mr .«- 

field2 CIark«- 

■field3 Kent<- 

-field4 1655 Lois Lane*- 

+ ield5 Metropolis*- 

-fie1d6 NYh^m 19507<- 

field7 capef- 

•fieldS *5Q.80<- 

*- 

fieldl Miss«- 

■fie1d2 Sal 1 y«- 

■fieldS Something©! se*- 

field4 38-24-36 Waahoo Court*- 

tieldS Long Beach*- 

■fieldi CA^^'?3228<- 

■f iel d7 bikini*- 

■fieldS *208^ 

«- 

•fieldl Mrs.*- 

■field2 Hellen*- 

•field3 Housewi-fe*- 

+ ield4 258 Taken Place<- 

■field5 Contentsvi 1 1 e«- 

•field6 IN^^5?764<- 

+"ield7 dish t/jasher«- 

fieldB *758*- 

*- 



Page 92 20RLDF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



A. EXPLANATION OF FILE TYPES 



ZORLOF can accommodate 5 different text file types. they 
are: ZORLOF, Apparat EDTASM, Radio Shack. EDTASM, BASIC, and 
ASCII. Each of these file types and the differences that make 
them unique are explained on the following page. 

An ASCII file, as it is spoken of here, is a file, that 
when stored on disk, has no special codes embedded in it - just 
viewable text in ASCII format. This is the standard file format 
of most all garden variety word processors. 

Because of some of the special functions that ZORLOF has, 
it was necessary that ZORLOF files go beyond the standard ASCII 
file format and add status codes at the end of each line within 
the text files to define that line's justification, width, and 
indent, so that proper line positioning would be assured as 
files are read from the disk for viewing. 

The ASCII file format feature, present in ZORLOF, allows 
the operator the opportunity to save a file onto disk, in 
standard ASCII format instead of the ZORLOF text file format if 
so desired. Using this capability, any file created on ZORLOF 
can be read by other word processing systems, and vice versa. 

To save a file in ASCII format, just type the letters 
"ASC" in the width field and hit CLEAR-F. To save a file in 
ZORLOF text file format type a number <5 - 128) in the width 
field or leave it blank. Also any time a file is retrieved from 
disk, the width field will contain the file type: ASC - ASCII, 
BAS - BASIC, EDT - Apparat EDTASM, EDR - Radio Shack EDTASM, or 
a number (5-128) or- blank - ZORLOF. 

Note: If a file is loaded into the computer's memory for 
editting in ZAP format (4.58), the three letters "ZAP" will 
appear in the WIDTH FIELD. This does not indication a unique 
file type. It is instead an indication of a unique way of 
displaying and editing that can be done with any type of file. 



EXPLANATION OF FILE TYPES Page 93 



ZORLOF TEXT FILES 



The first character is a D4H, -followed by 
three charaters that comprise the width 
field of the top status line* followed by 
the text* ending with a 88H. Each text line 
is followed by three line status codes* the 
•first defines its justification* the second 
its width* the third its left indent. 
Identified by ZORLOF by the leading D4H. 



APPARAT 
EDTASM FILES 



The first charater is a 
first 6 ch aracters 

■followed by the text* 
Each line starts with 



D3H, followed by the 
of the file name* 

ending with a 1AH. 
5 ASCII digits with 



the 8th bit set (BBH - B9H1, words are 
separated by spaces (28H) and/or- tabs (09H>* 
and each line ends with a carriage return 
(BDH). Identified by ZORLOF by the leading 

D3H. 



RADIO SHACK 
EDTASM FILES 



This is the same as the Apparat EDTASM file 
except the D3H and the first 6 characters of 
the file name are not present in this file 
type. Identified by ZORLOF by a leading 
character- of BGH - B9H. 



BASIC TEXT FILES 



Similar to the Radio Shack. EDTASM file type 
except that the 8th bits of the line number 
digits are cleared (not set)* and the ending 
character of the file is a 00H. Identified 
by ZORLOF by a leading character of 38H - 
39H. 



ASCII TEXT FILES 



Similar- to the BASIC file type except the 
first character of the file is any 7-bit 
ASCII character except a digit (39H - 39H). 
Identified by ZORLOF by a leading character 
of 2iH - 2FH or 3AH - 7FH. 



Page 94 



APPENDIX A: ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



B. CUSTOMIZING ZORLOF 



The following is a list of some customizations you can 
make to ZORLOF/CMD, using the ZAP-PROCESSING feature described 
in section 4,58. You need only make those patches which you 
feel apply to your situation. Chances are none of them will 
apply. 

Be sure you understand the hexidecimal numbering system, 
since that is the way the addresses and the data are represented 
in "ZAP" format. One byte (one data value) is represented by 
two characters on the data line. There are 32 characters in the 
data portion of the line, thus there are 16 bytes represented 
per line. The last digit of the patch address (8-F), will 
always be that byte's offset within the data line. The first 
byte of the line will have an address that ends with "0", and 
the last byte Df the line will have an address that ends with 
"F". Therefore, the byte with address 2C7E will be found on the 
line labeled 2C78, and it will be the 15th byte of that line 
(2?th and 39th characters, not counting the address 
characters). 

Once the correct byte is found for the patch, type over 
the old value(s) with the new values(s). When finished with all 
the patches you want to make, use CLEAR-F to file the new 
version of ZORLOF/CMD back to the disk. Be sure you only make 
modifications to a copy of the original program, and not to the 
original itself. If for any reason you feel unsure about making 
any of these patches, send us the original disk, a copy disk, a 
list of the patches you wish to have done, and $5.90 for 
shipping and handling, and we will do the patching for- you. 



CUSTOMIZING ZORLOF Page 95 



B.l. 

On some printers an unexpected character may appear at the 
start of each line. This is due to the fact that the printer 
cannot handle the CANCEL code (18H) that ZQRLOF sends at the 
start of each line. This CANCEL code can be deleted using the 
■following patch. 

address old new 

0C43 18 SB 



B.2. 

On some older TRS-88 model l's the cursor may seem to 
disappear and then later reappear. This can be remedied by 
slowing down the blink, rate of the cursor. 

address old new 

3C1F 81 02 



B.3. 

If you wish to have the default for the KEYBOARD KLICK 

function (4.61) to be off at power up instead of on* install 
this patch. 

address old new 

3C7D 00 C9 



B.4. 

If you wish the BOLD text (5.1?) on your printouts to be 
achieved with greater than or fewer than 8 passes over the same 
text, install this patch. The "# u is the number of passes to 
acheive BOLDED text. Epson owners ignore this patch. Your 
EOLDING is done thru the overstrike-emphasize print mode in the 
printer and does not require more than one pass. 

address old new 

8C5A 8 "#" 



Page 96 APPENDIX B: ZORLOF OPERATOR'S MANUAL 



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